Definition of Affection

1. Noun. A positive feeling of liking. "The warmness of his welcome made us feel right at home"




Definition of Affection

1. n. The act of affecting or acting upon; the state of being affected.

Definition of Affection

1. Noun. The act of affecting or acting upon. ¹

2. Noun. The state of being affected. ¹

3. Noun. An attribute; a quality or property; a condition; a bodily state; as, figure, weight, etc., are affections of bodies. ¹

4. Noun. Bent of mind; a feeling or natural impulse or natural impulse acting upon and swaying the mind; any emotion; as, the benevolent affections, esteem, gratitude, etc.; the malevolent affections, hatred, envy, etc.; inclination; disposition; propensity; tendency. ¹

5. Noun. Kind feeling; love; zealous or tender attachment; settled good will. ¹

6. Noun. (medicine) Disease; morbid symptom; malady; as, a pulmonary affection. --Dunglison. ¹

7. Verb. to feel an affection, emotion or love for. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Affection

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Affection

1. 1. The act of affecting or acting upon; the state of being affected. 2. An attribute; a quality or property; a condition; a bodily state; as, figure, weight, etc, are affections of bodies. "The affections of quantity." "And, truly, waking dreams were, more or less, An old and strange affection of the house." (Tennyson) 3. Bent of mind; a feeling or natural impulse or natural impulse acting upon and swaying the mind; any emotion; as, the benevolent affections, esteem, gratitude, etc.; the malevolent affections, hatred, envy, etc.; inclination; disposition; propensity; tendency. "Affection is applicable to an unpleasant as well as a pleasant state of the mind, when impressed by any object or quality." (Cogan) 4. A settled good will; kind feeling; love; zealous or tender attachment; often in the pl. Formerly followed by to, but now more generally by for or towards; as, filial, social, or conjugal affections; to have an affection for or towards children. "All his affections are set on his own country." (Macaulay) 5. Prejudice; bias. 6. Disease; morbid symptom; malady; as, a pulmonary affection. 7. The lively representation of any emotion. 8. Affectation. "Spruce affection." 9. Passion; violent emotion. "Most wretched man, That to affections does the bridle lend." (Spenser) Synonym: Attachment, passion, tenderness, fondness, kindness, love, good will. See Attachment, Disease. Origin: F. Affection, L. Affectio, fr. Afficere. See Affect. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Affection Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Affection Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Affection

affected role
affectedly
affectedness
affectednesses
affecteds
affectee
affectees
affecter
affecters
affectest
affecteth
affectibility
affectible
affecting
affectingly
affection (current term)
affectional
affectionally
affectionate
affectionated
affectionately
affectionateness
affectionates
affectionating
affectioned
affectionless
affections
affective
affective disorder
affective disorders

Literary usage of Affection

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental by David ( Hume (1898)
"Over and above the social and self-regarding affections proper to a ' sensible ' creature, the characteristic of man is a ' rational affection ' for ..."

2. The Works of Joseph Bellamy by Joseph Bellamy, Tryon Edwards (1850)
"It is true, that man is worse than the beasts, who is without natural affection, for they evidently are not; but every man is not a saint, because he has ..."

3. The American Journal of Psychology by Granville Stanley Hall, Edward Bradford Titchener (1911)
"Then follows the chapter on affection. He stands by his position stated in the Outline. "The writer holds that there is an elementary affective process; ..."

4. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: With Strictures on Political and Moral by Mary Wollstonecraft (1891)
"PARENTAL affection is, perhaps, the blindest modification of perverse self-love; for we have not, like the French,1 two terms to distinguish the pursuit of ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Affection

Search for Affection on Dictionary.com!Search for Affection on Thesaurus.com!Search for Affection on Google!Search for Affection on Wikipedia!

Search