Definition of Astronomy

1. Noun. The branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole.




Definition of Astronomy

1. n. Astrology.

Definition of Astronomy

1. Noun. The study of the physical universe beyond the Earth's atmosphere, including the process of mapping locations and properties of the matter and radiation in the universe. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Astronomy

1. [n -MIES]

Medical Definition of Astronomy

1. 1. Astrology. "Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck; And yet methinks I have astronomy." (Shak) 2. The science which treats of the celestial bodies, of their magnitudes, motions, distances, periods of revolution, eclipses, constitution, physical condition, and of the causes of their various phenomena. 3. A treatise on, or text-book of, the science. Physical astronomy. See Physical. Origin: OE. Astronomie, F. Astronomie, L. Astronomia, fr. Gr, fr. Astronomer; star + to distribute, regulate. See Star, and Nomad. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Astronomy

astronomical telescope
astronomical twilight
astronomical unit
astronomical units
astronomical year
astronomical years
astronomically
astronomick
astronomies
astronomist
astronomists
astronomize
astronomized
astronomizes
astronomizing
astronomy (current term)
astronomy satellite
astronomy unit
astronuclear
astroparticle
astroparticles
astropause
astrophels
astrophic
astrophilately
astrophobia
astrophorid
astrophorids
astrophoto
astrophotograph

Literary usage of Astronomy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. International Library of Technology: A Series of Textbooks for Persons by International Textbook Company (1903)
"astronomy is the science that treats of the heavenly bodies. ... The science that covers this wide range is called General astronomy ; it is one of the most ..."

2. A Manual of Scientific Enquiry: Prepared for the Use of Officers in Her by Great Britain Admiralty, John Frederick William Herschel (1859)
"THE science of astronomy may occasionally derive benefit from the observations of navigators, in the following respects:— By contributions to astronomy in ..."

3. Proceedings by Royal Geographical Society (Great Britain), Norton Shaw, Francis Galton, William Spottiswoode, Clements Robert Markham, Henry Walter Bates, John Scott Keltie (1882)
"The means have been provided, by the Society, through which intending travellers can receive instruction iii practical astronomy, route surveying, ..."

4. Annual Record of Science and Industry for 1871-78 by Spencer Fullerton Baird (1877)
"Is presenting a review of the progress of astronomy during the past year, ... The true progress of observational astronomy is to be forwarded by the ..."

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