Definition of Backstroke

1. Noun. A swimming stroke that resembles the crawl except the swimmer lies on his or her back.

Generic synonyms: Swimming Stroke
Terms within: Flutter Kick



2. Verb. Swim on one's back.
Category relationships: Aquatics, Water Sport
Generic synonyms: Swim
Derivative terms: Backstroker

Definition of Backstroke

1. Noun. A swimming stroke swum lying on one's back, while rotating both arms through the water as to propel the swimmer backwards. ¹

2. Noun. (context: bellringing) The pull on the tail of the rope that swings the bell through a full circle (compare handstroke) ¹

3. Verb. To swim the backstroke. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Backstroke

1. [n -S]

Backstroke Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Backstroke

backstocks
backstop
backstopped
backstopping
backstops
backstories
backstory
backstrap
backstraps
backstreet
backstreets
backstress
backstresses
backstretches
backstroke (current term)
backstroked
backstroker
backstrokers
backstrokes
backstroking
backswept
backswimmer
backswing
backswings
backswords
backtag
backtagged
backtagging

Literary usage of Backstroke

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The art and science of change ringing by William Banister (1879)
"... two such movements comprise what is called a •whole pull ; separately, a half pull at hand (fig. 1) ; and half pull at backstroke (fig 2). Fig. 1. ..."

2. Habit and Instinct by Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1896)
"On this one occasion the accompanying consciousness arises wholly by backstroke. On subsequent occasions, under associative suggestion, ..."

3. The Navy Seal Physical Fitness Guide edited by Patricia A. Deuster (1997)
"Stroke-Associated Injuries Freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke place a great amount of stress on the shoulder joint. Use alternate or bilateral breathing ..."

4. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1897)
"On this first occasion the consciousness arises wholly by backstroke. " On subsequent occasions, under associative suggestion, revivals in consciousness of ..."

5. A Manual of Psychology by George Frederick Stout (1899)
"... first produce changes ln the other organs of the body; and these changes must by a backstroke react on the nervous system before the emotion can begin. ..."

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