Definition of Beguine

1. Noun. (Roman Catholic Church) a member of a lay sisterhood (one of several founded in the Netherlands in the 12th and 13th centuries); though not taking religious vows the sisters followed an austere life.

Group relationships: Sisterhood
Category relationships: Church Of Rome, Roman Catholic, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church
Generic synonyms: Sister



2. Noun. Music written in the bolero rhythm of the beguine dance.
Generic synonyms: Dance Music

3. Noun. A ballroom dance that originated in the French West Indies; similar to the rumba.
Generic synonyms: Ballroom Dance, Ballroom Dancing

Definition of Beguine

1. n. A woman belonging to one of the religious and charitable associations or communities in the Netherlands, and elsewhere, whose members live in beguinages and are not bound by perpetual vows.

Definition of Beguine

1. Noun. A ballroom dance, similar to a slow rumba, that originated in the French West Indies. ¹

2. Noun. The music for this dance. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Beguine

1. a lively dance [n -S]

Medical Definition of Beguine

1. A woman belonging to one of the religious and charitable associations or communities in the Netherlands, and elsewhere, whose members live in beguinages and are not bound by perpetual vows. Origin: F. Beguine; LL. Beguina, beghina; fr. Lambert le Begue (the Stammerer) the founder of the order. (Du Cange). Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Beguine Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Beguine Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Beguine

beguiler
beguilers
beguiles
beguilest
beguileth
beguiling
beguilingly
beguilingness
beguilings
beguilt
beguilted
beguilty
beguin
beguinage
beguinages
beguine (current term)
beguines
beguins
begulf
begulfed
begulfing
begulfs
begum
begums
begun
begunk
begunked
begunking
begunks
beguyle

Literary usage of Beguine

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The American Quarterly Review by Robert Walsh (1835)
"The Princess: or the beguine. By Lady Morgan, author of "O'Donnell," &c. Philadelphia: 1835. FEMALE writers are supposed to have a claim on the peculiar ..."

2. Woman's Work in the Church: Historical Notes on Deaconesses and Sisterhoods by John Malcolm Forbes Ludlow (1866)
"F, Translation of one of the later beguine Rules (see P- The following is a translation of the rule of the beguines ..."

3. Steam Voyages on the Seine, the Moselle, & the Rhine: With Railroad Visits by Michael Joseph Quin (1843)
"Menage of a beguine. Her Fancy-work. Her Duties. beguine Drea. Evening Service. The Benediction. Solemn Scene. Antiquity of Be- guinei. My Uncle Toby. ..."

4. Contested Etymologies in the Dictionary of the Rev. W. W. Skeat by Hensleigh Wedgwood (1882)
"beguine, BIGOT.—The same wave of religious feeling which gave such rapid growth to the preaching Orders of St. Francis and St. Dominic in the beginning of ..."

5. A History of Nursing: The Evolution of Nursing Systems from the Earliest by Mary Adelaide Nutting, Lavinia L. Dock (1907)
"No beguine shall saunter about the streets without supervision, ... After the evening bell no beguine shall sit at the door on the street or go out except ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Beguine

Search for Beguine on Dictionary.com!Search for Beguine on Thesaurus.com!Search for Beguine on Google!Search for Beguine on Wikipedia!

Search