Definition of Brigandage

1. n. Life and practice of brigands; highway robbery; plunder.



Definition of Brigandage

1. Noun. The lifestyle of a brigand. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Brigandage

1. [n -S]

Brigandage Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Brigandage

brigader
brigaders
brigades
brigadier
brigadier general
brigadier generals
brigadiers
brigadiership
brigadierships
brigading
brigadista
brigadistas
brigalow
brigalows
brigand
brigandage (current term)
brigandages
brigandine
brigandines
brigandish
brigandism
brigandisms
brigands
brigantine
brigantines
brigge
bright
bright's disease
bright-eyed
bright-eyed and bushy-tailed

Literary usage of Brigandage

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Cambridge Modern History by John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Acton, Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero, Ernest Alfred Benians (1909)
"It is with this problem of brigandage in Naples that the success of the newly formed kingdom of Italy was largely bound up, for its suppression had become a ..."

2. The diplomatic protection of citizens abroad or the law of international claims by Edwin Montefiore Borchard (1915)
"brigandage. The liability of the state for acts of brigandage brings up practically the same questions as those which have just been discussed. ..."

3. A History of Greece: From Its Conquest by the Romans to the Present Time, B by George Finlay (1877)
"A project of the kind was quickly carried into execution. During the winter of 1834 and the spring of 1835 brigandage assumed a verj- alarming aspect. ..."

4. Underground: Gambling and Its Horrors. by Thomas Wallace Knox (1876)
"brigandage is rapidly becoming a thing of the past in most parts of Europe, ... Russia, which has few railways, has more cases of brigandage than its ..."

5. Greece and the Greeks of the Present Day by Edmond About (1855)
"Internal policy—Chiefs of brigands at Court—brigandage a political weapon •—Torture employed against the friends of the opposition—Horrible crimes brought ..."

6. The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine (1864)
"... have marked the course of Neapolitan brigandage :— We have been assured, and the s-surance has been repeated in all tae districts which we have visited, ..."

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