Definition of Cistvaen

1. a cist [n -S] - See also: cist



Cistvaen Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Cistvaen

cisternae subarachnoideales
cisternal
cisternal maturation model
cisternal puncture
cisternography
cisterns
cistic
cistrome
cistromes
cistron
cistronic
cistrons
cists
cistus
cistuses
cistvaen (current term)
cistvaens
cisvestism
ciswoman
ciswomen
cit
citability
citable
citadel
citadels
cital
citalopram
citals
citation
citation-cord

Literary usage of Cistvaen

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The History and Antiquities of Somersetshire: Being a General and Parochial by William Phelps (1836)
"Several forts of minor consequence are found on the less elevated summits, being outposts from the larger camps. cistvaen ON ..."

2. Outlines of the History of Art by Wilhelm Lübke (1904)
"These pass insensibly into the cistvaen, because it is never certain whether a ... cistvaen, a stone burial chamber, usually a mere box covered by the earth ..."

3. Remains of the Prehistoric Age in England by Sir Bertram Coghill Alan Windle (1904)
"Circle and cistvaen. Harford, near Ivybridge. Circle and cistvaen. Hound Tor. Circle with cistvaen. *"The Long Stones. ..."

4. The Gentleman's Magazine (1837)
"Some large trenches having been made across the barrow, “at the depth of about three feet from the apex, the loose covering stones of a cistvaen were ..."

5. Archaeologia Cambrensis by Cambrian Archaeological Association (1879)
"OF THE PRESENT WELSH CRAVES. sequent rites, such as collecting the bones, putting them into an urn, which was then placed in a cistvaen and covered with a ..."

6. The Yorkshire Library. A Bibliographical Account of Books on Topography by William Boyne (1869)
"Stone covering of the cistvaen; cistvaen opened; Drinking Cup; Urn ; Stone Hammer ; Flint Spear-head. Published at 3*. Gd., stitched. ..."

7. Notes on Ancient Britain and the Britons by WILLIAM. BARNES (1858)
"had nothing else, or nothing better than berries to eat, since it is clear from a coin found in this Briton's cistvaen, that he lived as late as the Emperor ..."

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