Definition of Constriction

1. Noun. A narrowing that reduces the flow through a channel.

Exact synonyms: Bottleneck, Chokepoint
Generic synonyms: Narrowing
Derivative terms: Bottleneck, Constrict



2. Noun. Tight or narrow compression.
Exact synonyms: Coarctation
Generic synonyms: Compression, Condensation, Contraction
Derivative terms: Constrict

3. Noun. A tight feeling in some part of the body. "Emotion caused a constriction of his throat"
Exact synonyms: Tightness
Generic synonyms: Feeling
Derivative terms: Tight

4. Noun. The action or process of compressing.
Specialized synonyms: Spasm, Squeeze, Strangulation, Vasoconstriction
Generic synonyms: Compressing, Compression
Derivative terms: Constrict

Definition of Constriction

1. n. The act of constricting by means of some inherent power or by movement or change in the thing itself, as distinguished from compression.

Definition of Constriction

1. Noun. The act of constricting, the state of being constricted, or something that constricts ¹

2. Noun. A narrow part of something; a stricture ¹

3. Noun. A compression ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Constriction

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Constriction

1. The act of constricting. (12 Dec 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Constriction

constrainedly
constrainedness
constrainer
constrainers
constrainest
constraineth
constraining
constrains
constraint
constraintive
constraints
constrict
constricted
constricteth
constricting
constriction (current term)
constriction ring
constrictions
constrictions of ureter
constrictive
constrictive bronchiolitis
constrictive endocarditis
constrictive pericarditis
constrictor
constrictors
constricts
constringe
constringed
constringent
constringes

Literary usage of Constriction

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1900)
"We may now make the broad statement, qualifications of which we will consider later on, that constriction of the pupil, brought about by light falling on ..."

2. The Practitioner by Gale Group, ProQuest Information and Learning Company (1891)
"disturbed circulation with venous stasis are present, the fact is most distinctly a point in favour of constriction of the mitral orifice. ..."

3. A Text book of physiology by Michael Foster (1894)
"We may now make the broad statement, qualifications of which we will consider later on, that constriction of the pupil, brought about by light falling on ..."

4. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor (1892)
"rLA- TION, OK WAS THE constriction Al'l'LIKD TO THIS MCI K ... .strangulation to he an act of violence, in which constriction ta applied directly to the ..."

5. Medical jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor, Edward Hartshorne (1861)
"ACCIDENTAL MARKS RESEMBLING THOSE OF STRANGULATION—constriction BEFORE AND AFTER ... constriction WITHOUT ECCHYMOSIS—EXAMINATION OF THE MOTHER —SUMMARY OF ..."

6. The principles and practice of medical jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor (1873)
"This medical jurist defines ' strangulation to be an net of violence, in which constriction is applied directly to the neck, either around it or in the ..."

7. A Treatise on the Science and Practice of Midwifery by William Smoult Playfair (1880)
"The constriction .seems to have grasped the fœtus with such force as to have rendered ... The treatment must depend on the force and amount of constriction. ..."

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