Definition of Ductility

1. Noun. The malleability of something that can be drawn into threads or wires or hammered into thin sheets.

Exact synonyms: Ductileness
Generic synonyms: Malleability, Plasticity
Derivative terms: Ductile



Definition of Ductility

1. n. The property of a metal which allows it to be drawn into wires or filaments.

Definition of Ductility

1. Noun. (physics) Ability of a material to be drawn out longitudinally to a reduced section without fracture under the action of a tensile force. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Ductility

1. [n -TIES]

Ductility Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Ductility

ductal
ductal aneurysm
ductal carcinoma
ductal carcinoma in situ
ductal hyperplasia
ductal papilloma
ducted
ducted fan
ductible
ductile
ductile iron
ductilely
ductilimeter
ductilimeters
ductilities
ductility (current term)
ductin
ducting
ductings
duction
ductions
ductless
ductless gland
ductless glands
ductlike
ductopenia
ductopenic
ductor
ductors
ducts

Literary usage of Ductility

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Metallography and Heat Treatment of Iron and Steel by Albert Sauveur (1918)
"ductility of Steel vs. Its Structural Composition. — From the known ductility, as expressed by its elongation under tension, of ferrite and the known ..."

2. Johnson's Materials of Construction by John Butler Johnson (1918)
"Since ductility is also much influenced by variations in heat treatment and by the gauge length (Art. 711 and 106) it is not possible to give an accurate ..."

3. Elements of Chemistry: For the Use of Colleges, Academies, and Schools by Victor Regnault (1853)
"Malleability and ductility.—When metals are subjected to blows with the ... The metal is then said to be hammer-hardened, but its original ductility is ..."

4. The Annals of Philosophy by Richard Phillips, E W Brayley (1822)
"An Account of several Circumstances connected with the ductility of Glass. ... THE great ductility of glass seems, at an early period of the history of that ..."

5. Allen's Commercial Organic Analysis: A Treatise on the Properties, Modes of by Alfred Henry Allen (1917)
"The briquette is placed in water at 77° for 15 minutes, and then drawn out in water at 77° F. in a ductility machine, so regulated that it only moves 5 cm. ..."

6. The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (1905)
"(C 0-17, Cr 1-55, Ni 3-02 per cent), the tenacity rising to 59 tons, and the ductility dropping only from 25—20 per cent. Test No. 80 (C 0-64, Cr 2-01, ..."

7. Steel Rails: Their History, Properties, Strength and Manufacture, with Notes by William Hamilton Sellew (1913)
"Influence of the Proportion of Manganese on the ductility of Mangane.se Steel. ... To show that the maxima for tensile strength and ductility coincide, ..."

8. Mechanical Technology: Being a Treatise on the Materials and Preparatory by George Frederick Charnock (1916)
"ductility is that property which enables a body to be drawn out, ... ductility depends mainly upon tenacity, and to a less extent upon hardness. ..."

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