Definition of Electrophorus

1. Noun. A simple electrostatic generator that generates repeated charges of static electricity.




2. Noun. Type genus of the family Electrophoridae; electric eels.
Exact synonyms: Genus Electrophorus
Generic synonyms: Fish Genus
Group relationships: Electrophoridae, Family Electrophoridae
Member holonyms: Electric Eel, Electrophorus Electric

Definition of Electrophorus

1. n. An instrument for exciting electricity, and repeating the charge indefinitely by induction, consisting of a flat cake of resin, shellac, or ebonite, upon which is placed a plate of metal.

Definition of Electrophorus

1. Noun. (dated physics) Any early apparatus, consisting of a rubber disk and a metal plate, for generating static electricity ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Electrophorus

1. [n -PHORI]

Medical Definition of Electrophorus

1. An instrument for exciting electricity, and repeating the charge indefinitely by induction, consisting of a flat cake of resin, shelllac, or ebonite, upon which is placed a plate of metal. Origin: NL, fr. Combining form electro- + Gr. To bear. (04 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Electrophorus

electrophonic
electrophonic effect
electrophonically
electrophore
electrophores
electrophorese
electrophoresed
electrophoreses
electrophoresing
electrophoresis
electrophoretic
electrophoretically
electrophoretogram
electrophori
electrophorized
electrophorus (current term)
electrophoruses
electrophosphorescence
electrophosphorescent
electrophotographic
electrophotographically
electrophotography
electrophototherapy
electrophrenic
electrophrenic respiration
electrophylic
electrophysiologic audiometry
electrophysiological
electrophysiological studies
electrophysiologically

Literary usage of Electrophorus

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Practical Electricity: A Laboratory and Lecture Course for First Year by William Edward Ayrton (1896)
"electrophorus.—The oldest form of influence machine is the ... 137), usually ebonite in the modern electrophorus, fastened into a metal backing B, ..."

2. A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism by James Clerk ( Maxwell (1873)
"The electrophorus consists of a plate of resin or of ebonite backed with metal, and a plate of metal of the same size. An insulating handle can be screwed ..."

3. An Essay on Electricity: Explaining the Principles of that Useful Science by George Adams (1799)
"73, represents an electrophorus. This instrument was invented by Mr. ... Resinous electrics generally succeed better for an electrophorus than those made ..."

4. Lessons in Electricity at the Royal Institution 1875-6 by John Tyndall (1898)
"We will now apply the principle of induction to explain a very beautiful invention, made known by the celebrated Volta in 1775. § 15. The electrophorus. ..."

5. Elements of Chemistry: Theoretical and Practical by William Allen Miller (1867)
"The electrophorus of Volta is an inexpensive and portable kind of electrical machine which ... The action of the electrophorus may be thus explained. ..."

6. Practical Electricity: A Laboratory and Lecture-course, for First Year by William Edward Ayrton (1891)
"If it be desired to charge an insulated conductor of large capacity to a high negative potential, we might use an electrophorus with I (Fig. ..."

7. Elementary Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism by George Carey Foster, Alfred William Porter, Jules François Joubert (1909)
"The electrophorus.—The action of the electrophorus (Fig. 22) depends essentially on electrical influence. The instrument consists of a flat, smooth plate of ..."

8. An Introduction to Natural Philosophy: Designed as a Text Book, for the Use by Denison Olmsted (1832)
"The construction of the electrophorus is as follows. Around metallic plate (A) called the sole, (usually of brass,) is placed on an insulating support. ..."

Other Resources:

Search for Electrophorus on Dictionary.com!Search for Electrophorus on Thesaurus.com!Search for Electrophorus on Google!Search for Electrophorus on Wikipedia!

Search