Definition of Enjambed

1. Adjective. (context: grammar of two syntactic units) continued without a pause ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Enjambed

1. marked by the continuation of a sentence from one line of a poem to the next [adj]

Enjambed Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Enjambed

enigmatology
enilconazole
enilospirone
enimine
enimines
enioy
enisle
enisled
enisles
enisling
enjail
enjailed
enjailing
enjails
enjamb
enjambed (current term)
enjambement
enjambements
enjambing
enjambment
enjambments
enjambs
enjoin
enjoinder
enjoinders
enjoined
enjoiner
enjoiners
enjoining
enjoinment

Literary usage of Enjambed

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A History of English Prosody from the Twelfth Century to the Present Day by George Saintsbury (1908)
"... or enjambed form—Chalkhill, Marmion, and Chamberlayne—The constitutive difference of the two styles— Dangers of enjambment—Note on the two couplets. ..."

2. Minor Poets of the Caroline Period by George Saintsbury (1905)
"It is, as has been said, the last, and in more senses than one the greatest, of poems written in that ' enjambed ' and paragraphed variety of the heroic, ..."

3. The Earlier Renaissance by George Saintsbury (1901)
"In the eight lines of the apostrophe to Isabella's soul, the second, third, and fifth are " enjambed," and only three end with a real break. ..."

4. Periods of European Literature by George Saintsbury (1901)
"In the eight Hues of the apostrophe to Isabella's soul, the second, third, and fifth are "enjambed," and only three end with a real break. ..."

5. The Library of Literary Criticism of English and American Authors by Charles Wells Moulton (1901)
"Blackmore's couplets are often enjambed. SAINTSBURY, GEORGE,'1898, A Short History of English Literature, p. 555. Samuel Clarke 1675-1729. ..."

6. A Short History of English Literature by George Saintsbury (1898)
"The piece upon the " Happy Birth of the Duke of Gloucester" in 1640, though sometimes " enjambed," shows on the whole a great preference for, ..."

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