Definition of Entropy

1. Noun. (communication theory) a numerical measure of the uncertainty of an outcome. "The signal contained thousands of bits of information"

Exact synonyms: Information, Selective Information
Category relationships: Communication Theory, Communications
Generic synonyms: Information Measure



2. Noun. (thermodynamics) a thermodynamic quantity representing the amount of energy in a system that is no longer available for doing mechanical work. "Entropy increases as matter and energy in the universe degrade to an ultimate state of inert uniformity"
Exact synonyms: Randomness, S
Generic synonyms: Physical Property
Specialized synonyms: Conformational Entropy
Category relationships: Thermodynamics

Definition of Entropy

1. n. A certain property of a body, expressed as a measurable quantity, such that when there is no communication of heat the quantity remains constant, but when heat enters or leaves the body the quantity increases or diminishes. If a small amount, h, of heat enters the body when its temperature is t in the thermodynamic scale the entropy of the body is increased by h &?; t. The entropy is regarded as measured from some standard temperature and pressure. Sometimes called the thermodynamic function.

Definition of Entropy

1. Noun. (context: thermodynamics countable) ¹

2. Noun. (context: statistics information theory countable) A measure of the amount of information and noise present in a signal. Originally a tongue in cheek coinage, has fallen into disuse to avoid confusion with thermodynamic entropy. ¹

3. Noun. The tendency of a system that is left to itself to descend into chaos. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Entropy

1. a thermodynamic measure of disorder [n -PIES] : ENTROPIC [adj]

Medical Definition of Entropy

1. The amount of disorder in a system. (09 Oct 1997)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Entropy

entrist
entrists
entrochal
entrochite
entrochites
entroduction
entrold
entropic
entropic doom
entropically
entropies
entropion
entropionise
entropions
entropium
entropy (current term)
entropy trapping
entropyless
entropylike
entrust
entrusted
entrusting
entrustment
entrustments
entrusts
entry
entry-level
entry points for the eye
entry word

Literary usage of Entropy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Principles of Thermodynamics by George Alfred Goodenough (1920)
"From the definition of entropy, namely, the ratio of the unavailable energy ... The entropy of a system, like the volume and energy, depends upon the mass ..."

2. Nature by Norman Lockyer (1878)
"Rankine calls it the thermodynamic function, and Clausius the entropy. Clausius, however, besides inventing the most convenient name for this function, ..."

3. Heat and Thermodynamics by Francis M. Hartmann (1911)
"CHAPTER XI APPLICATIONS OF TEMPERATURE-entropy DIAGRAMS 110. IN Art. 102, it was shown analytically that, even under perfect conditions, a steam engine and ..."

4. The Theory of Heat by Thomas Preston (1894)
"at TJ, and if dQ2 has been given out at r2, then, in order that the entropy may remain unaltered, this exchange must take place in such a way that ..."

5. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1903)
"The entropy increase which is associated with a steady sweep may be ... While an amount of heat Я is transferred the decrease of entropy of body A is Zdll/T ..."

6. A Text-book of Physics by William Watson (1905)
"the path CD, we have, since the change in entropy is equal to the quotient of the heat supplied by the temperature, change of entropy = But 7", ..."

7. Elements of Heat-power Engineering by Clarence Floyd Hirshfeld, William Nichols Barnard (1912)
"entropy of the materials concerned. A similar increase also occurs with all other natural ... Thus the entropy of all substances always tends to increase. ..."

8. Elements of Heat-power Engineering by Clarence Floyd Hirshfeld, William Nichols Barnard (1915)
"entropy of the materials concerned. A similar increase also occurs with all other natural ... Thus the entropy of all substances always tends to increase. ..."

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