Definition of Escheat

1. Noun. A reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs.

Category relationships: Jurisprudence, Law
Generic synonyms: Reversion



2. Noun. The property that reverts to the state.

Definition of Escheat

1. n. The falling back or reversion of lands, by some casualty or accident, to the lord of the fee, in consequence of the extinction of the blood of the tenant, which may happen by his dying without heirs, and formerly might happen by corruption of blood, that is, by reason of a felony or attainder.

2. v. i. To revert, or become forfeited, to the lord, the crown, or the State, as lands by the failure of persons entitled to hold the same, or by forfeiture.

3. v. t. To forfeit.

Definition of Escheat

1. Noun. (legal) The return of property of a deceased person to the state (originally to a feudal lord) where there are no legal heirs or claimants. ¹

2. Noun. (legal) The property so reverted. ¹

3. Noun. (obsolete) Plunder, booty. ¹

4. Verb. to revert by this process ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Escheat

1. to confiscate [v -ED, -ING, -S] - See also: confiscate

Medical Definition of Escheat

1. To revert, or become forfeited, to the lord, the crown, or the State, as lands by the failure of persons entitled to hold the same, or by forfeiture. In this country it is the general rule that when the title to land fails by defect of heirs or devisees, it necessarily escheats to the State; but forfeiture of estate from crime is hardly known in this country, and corruption of blood is universally abolished. Origin: Esheated; Escheating. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Escheat Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Escheat Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Escheat

escharine
escharotic
escharotick
escharotics
escharotomy
eschars
eschatocol
eschatocols
eschatological
eschatologically
eschatologies
eschatologist
eschatology
eschaton
eschaunge
escheat (current term)
escheatable
escheatage
escheated
escheating
escheatment
escheatments
escheator
escheators
escheats
escherichia
escherichia coli infections
escherichia coli o157
eschevin
eschevins

Literary usage of Escheat

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Commentaries on the Laws of England by William Blackstone, William Carey Jones (1915)
"a writ of escheat:*3 on failure of which, or by doing any. act that amounts to an implied waiver of his right, as by accepting homage or rent of a stranger ..."

2. A Digest of the Laws of England by John Comyns, Anthony Hammond (1822)
"So, if tenant in tail with the fee expectant to himself, dies without heir, the lord shall have a writ-escheat; for the tenant in tail held his reversion of ..."

3. A Treatise on the American Law of Real Property by Emory Washburn (1868)
"What is escheat, and how far it prevails. 2. Forfeiture for crime does ... Remainders may escheat. 9. State takes only estate of the deceased, by escheat. ..."

4. Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery: From by Francis Vesey, Great Britain Court of Chancery (1833)
"escheat. 1. To the Crown against trustee not having the legal estate. 2. Leave to traverse the inquisition. 3. Lease by the Crown to party discovering. 1. ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Escheat

Search for Escheat on Dictionary.com!Search for Escheat on Thesaurus.com!Search for Escheat on Google!Search for Escheat on Wikipedia!

Search

Translations