Definition of Feast

1. Noun. A ceremonial dinner party for many people.

Exact synonyms: Banquet
Generic synonyms: Dinner, Dinner Party
Specialized synonyms: Gaudy
Derivative terms: Banquet



2. Verb. Partake in a feast or banquet. "Sam and Sue feast"
Exact synonyms: Banquet, Junket
Generic synonyms: Eat
Related verbs: Banquet, Junket
Specialized synonyms: Wine And Dine
Derivative terms: Feasting

3. Noun. Something experienced with great delight. ; "A feast for the eyes"
Generic synonyms: Thing

4. Verb. Provide a feast or banquet for. "Sam cannot feast Sue "
Exact synonyms: Banquet, Junket
Related verbs: Banquet, Junket
Generic synonyms: Host
Derivative terms: Banquet, Banquet

5. Noun. A meal that is well prepared and greatly enjoyed. ; "They put out quite a spread"
Exact synonyms: Banquet, Spread
Generic synonyms: Meal, Repast
Derivative terms: Banquet

6. Verb. Gratify. "Feed one's eyes on a gorgeous view"
Exact synonyms: Feed
Generic synonyms: Regale, Treat

7. Noun. An elaborate party (often outdoors).
Exact synonyms: Fete, Fiesta
Generic synonyms: Party
Specialized synonyms: Luau, Potlatch
Derivative terms: Fete

Definition of Feast

1. n. A festival; a holiday; a solemn, or more commonly, a joyous, anniversary.

2. v. i. To eat sumptuously; to dine or sup on rich provisions, particularly in large companies, and on public festivals.

3. v. t. To entertain with sumptuous provisions; to treat at the table bountifully; as, he was feasted by the king.

Definition of Feast

1. Noun. A very large meal, often of a ceremonial nature. ¹

2. Noun. Something delightful ¹

3. Verb. (intransitive) To partake in a feast, or large meal. ¹

4. Verb. (intransitive) To dwell upon (something) with delight. ¹

5. Verb. (transitive) To hold a feast in honor of (someone). ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Feast

1. to eat sumptuously [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Feast

1. 1. To eat sumptuously; to dine or sup on rich provisions, particularly in large companies, and on public festivals. "And his sons went and feasted in their houses." (Job. I. 4) 2. To be highly gratified or delighted. "With my love's picture then my eye doth feast." (Shak) Origin: OE. Festen, cf. OF. Fester to rest from work, F. Feter to celebrate a holiday. See Feast. 1. To entertain with sumptuous provisions; to treat at the table bountifully; as, he was feasted by the king. 2. To delight; to gratify; as, to feast the soul. "Feast your ears with the music a while." (Shak) Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Feast Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Feast

fearsomely
fearsomeness
fearsomenesses
feasance
feasances
fease
feased
feases
feasibilities
feasibility
feasibility studies
feasible
feasibleness
feasibly
feasing
feast (current term)
feast-day
feast day
feast days
feast for the eyes
feast one's eyes
feast or famine
feasted
feaster
feasters
feastest
feasteth
feastful
feasting
feastings

Literary usage of Feast

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"Originally the Church only celebrated the feast of the Conception of Mary, as she kept the feast of St. John's conception, not discussing the sinlessness. ..."

2. The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge: Embracing by Johann Jakob Herzog, Philip Schaff, Albert Hauck (1909)
"27 gives an account of a festival analogous to the feast of booths. ... In Maccabean times arose the feast of the dedication of the temple, beginning on the ..."

3. Publications by Folklore Society (Great Britain) (1908)
"24, 1844, appeared the following account of the feast of St. Wilfrid at Ripon and the races held there on the feast-day. The account was accompanied by two ..."

4. Le Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of His Noble by Thomas Malory, Alfred William Pollard, William Caxton (1903)
"... Sir Tristram to go unto the court, to the great feast of Pentecost. ... told him of the great feast that should be at Pentecost next following, ..."

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