Definition of Gerund

1. Noun. A noun formed from a verb (such as the '-ing' form of an English verb when used as a noun).

Generic synonyms: Deverbal Noun, Verbal Noun
Derivative terms: Gerundial



Definition of Gerund

1. n. A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle.

Definition of Gerund

1. Noun. (grammar) A verbal form that functions as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund has the same spelling as a present participle, but functions differently.) ¹

2. Noun. (grammar) In some languages such as Italian or Russian, a verbal form similar to a present participle, but functioning as an adverb. These words are sometimes referred to as conjunctive participles. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Gerund

1. a verbal noun [n -S]

Gerund Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Gerund

geroscientists
gerroff
gerrymander
gerrymandered
gerrymandering
gerrymanders
gersdorffite
gersdorffites
gershayim
gershayims
gerstleyite
gerstmannite
gert
gertcha
geru
gerund (current term)
gerund-participle
gerundial
gerundive
gerundively
gerundives
gerunds
gery
gesellschaft
gesellschafts
gesith
gesiths
gesling
geslings
gesneria

Literary usage of Gerund

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges: Founded on by Joseph Henry Allen, James Bradstreet Greenough (1916)
"gerund 501. The gerund is the neuter of the gerundive, used sub- stantively in ... The gerund expresses an action of the verb in the form of a verbal noun. ..."

2. Education by Project Innovation (Organization) (1895)
"Longman says a gerund may be called a verbal noun, and the statement may be true ... Meiklejohn tells us that the gerund is a noun formed from a verb by the ..."

3. A New English Grammar, Logical and Historical by Henry Sweet (1903)
"gerund. 2328. When the supine is substituted for the gerund in the subject-relation, it seems to bring out more strongly the attributes of ..."

4. A Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges by George Martin Lane (1903)
"The gerundive and gerund. [2237—2241. THE gerundIVE AND gerund. 2237. ‘I'he gerundive is a verbal adjective (899). The gerund is a neuter verbal substantive ..."

5. A Practical Introduction to Latin Prose Composition by Thomas Kerchever Arnold (1908)
"The gerund is a verbal substantive in -ndum, formed from the present tense of the verb.2 ... Whether the gerund arose out of the gerundive, or vice versa, ..."

6. A Grammar of the Latin Language from Plautus to Suetonius by Henry John Roby (1874)
"The substantives are the gerund, the accusative of substantives with stems in -tu (active supine), and the nominative of substantives with stems in -ion. ..."

7. A Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges by Albert Harkness (1880)
"The Accusative of the gerund is used only after Prepositions. ... The gerund and the infinitive are kindred forms, expressing the meaning of the verb in the ..."

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