Definition of Hight

1. n. A variant of Height.



2. v. t. & i. To be called or named.

Definition of Hight

1. Verb. (archaic transitive) To call, name. ¹

2. Verb. (archaic intransitive) To be called or named. ¹

3. Adjective. (archaic) Called, named. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Hight

1. to command [v -ED, -ING, -S] - See also: command

Hight Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Hight

highroad
highroads
highs
highschool
highschoolboy
highschoolboys
highschooler
highschoolers
highschoolgirl
highschoolgirls
highschools
highspot
highspots
highstand
highstreet
hight (current term)
hightail
hightail it
hightailed
hightailing
hightails
highted
highth
highths
highting
hightop
hightops
hights
highty-tighty
highwater

Literary usage of Hight

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Library Journal by American Library Association, Library Association (1885)
"I succeeded very well in making one for measuring the hight of books; but when I attempted to construct one to accurately measure their widths, ..."

2. Coal Mining in Arkansas by Alvin Arthur Steel (1910)
"hight of working places. The combined thickness of the coal, its partings, and the draw slate over it, determine the hight of the place in which most of the ..."

3. American Machinists' Handbook and Dictionary of Shop Terms: A Reference Book by Fred Herbert Colvin, Frank Arthur Stanley (1909)
"hight OF WORK The work should be at a convenient hight which will usually vary from 40 to 44 inches for ... This means the hight of the work, not the bench. ..."

4. Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and His Noble Knights by Sir Thomas Malory (1868)
"And there was a lord that hight the earl de Vale, that held great war against this man's nephew, the which hight ..."

5. Handbook of the English Language by Robert Gordon Latham (1875)
"The Palatals k and g have an inordinate tendency to change, and when they become y or w, or h, may comport themselves as the h- in hight ..."

6. Early Indiana Trials and Sketches: Reminiscences by Oliver Hampton Smith (1858)
"Judge Hun- tington was under the common hight. large head, high retreating ... Mr. Evans was a well-sot man, rather below the common hight. large head, ..."

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