Definition of Hyperploidy

1. [n -DIES]



Medical Definition of Hyperploidy

1. Describes a cell or organism which has more than the normal total number of chromosomes. For example: humans normally have 46 chromosomes per cell - but if a human individual has 47 or more chromosomes per cell, then that person is hyperploid. Hyperploidy is the opposite of hypoploidy. (09 Oct 1997)

Hyperploidy Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Hyperploidy

hyperplasia
hyperplasias
hyperplastic
hyperplastic arteriosclerosis
hyperplastic cholecystosis
hyperplastic gastric polyp
hyperplastic gingivitis
hyperplastic graft
hyperplastic inflammation
hyperplastic osteoarthritis
hyperplastic polyp
hyperplasticity
hyperploid
hyperploidies
hyperploids
hyperploidy (current term)
hyperpluralism
hyperpnea
hyperpneas
hyperpneic
hyperpnœa
hyperpnœic
hyperpolarisation
hyperpolarisations
hyperpolarise
hyperpolarised
hyperpolarises
hyperpolarising
hyperpolarizabilities
hyperpolarizability

Literary usage of Hyperploidy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Gulf War And Health by Institute of Medicine (2005)
"Genetic effects of petroleum fuels: II. Analysis of chromosome loss and hyperploidy in peripheral lymphocytes of gasoline station attendants. ..."

2. Environmental Epidemiology by National Research Council (1992)
"(1988) found that DNA hyperploidy correlated with disease risk in workers exposed to 2-naphthylamine, a compound known to cause bladder cancer. ..."

3. Review Of Fluoride: Benefits And Risks. Report Of The Ad Hoc Subcommittee On ...by DIANE Publishing Company by DIANE Publishing Company (1992)
"This increase was characterized by the authors as resulting principally from age-related hyperploidy; they also reported that the fluoride content of the ..."

4. Toxicological Profile for Fluorides, Hydrogen Fluoride and Fluorine (F) (2001)
"The increased rate of damaged cells was due largely to an increase in hyperploidy, an effect for which the biological relevance is unknown. ..."

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