Definition of Interpose

1. Verb. Be or come between. "An interposing thicket blocked their way"

2. Verb. Introduce. "God interposed death"

Generic synonyms: Introduce



3. Verb. To insert between other elements. "She interjected clever remarks"

4. Verb. Get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action, or through force or threat of force. "Why did the U.S. not intervene earlier in WW II?"
Exact synonyms: Interfere, Intervene, Step In
Generic synonyms: Interact
Specialized synonyms: Meddle, Tamper, Interlope
Derivative terms: Interference, Intervenor, Intervention

Definition of Interpose

1. v. t. To place between; as, to interpose a screen between the eye and the light.

2. v. i. To be or come between.

3. n. Interposition.

Definition of Interpose

1. Verb. (transitive) To insert something (or oneself) between other things. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive) To interrupt a conversation by introducing a different subject or making a comment. ¹

3. Verb. (intransitive) To be inserted between parts or things. ¹

4. Verb. (intransitive) To intervene in a dispute, or in a conversation. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Interpose

1. [v -POSED, -POSING, -POSES]

Medical Definition of Interpose

1. 1. To be or come between. "Long hid by interposing hill or wood." (Cowper) 2. To step in between parties at variance; to mediate; as, the prince interposed and made peace. 3. To utter a sentiment by way of interruption. Synonym: To intervene, intercede, mediate, interfere, intermeddle. To Interpose, Intermeddle, Interfere. A man may often interpose with propriety in the concerns of others; he can never intermeddle without being impertinent or officious; nor can be interfere without being liable to the same charge, unless he has rights which are interfered with. "In our practical use, interference is something offensive. It is the pushing in of himself between two parties on the part of a third who was not asked, and is not thanked for his pains, and who, as the feeling of the word implies, had no business there; while interposition is employed to express the friendly, peacemaking mediation of one whom the act well became, and who, even if he was not specially invited thereunto, is still thanked for what he has done." Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Interpose Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Interpose

interpolating
interpolation
interpolations
interpolative
interpolator
interpolators
interpolymer
interpolymeric
interpolymers
interponent
interponents
interpopulation
interposable
interposal
interposals
interpose (current term)
interposed
interposer
interposers
interposes
interposing
interposit
interposition
interposition arthroplasty
interpositions
interpositive
interpositives
interposits
interpositus nucleus
interposure

Literary usage of Interpose

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Works of Rufus Choate: With a Memoir of His Life by Rufus Choate, Samuel Gilman Brown (1862)
"Let me say, Sir, in the first place, that, if you have power to interpose after judgment, you have power to do so before. If you can reverse a judgment, ..."

2. A Treatise on the Bankruptcy Law of the United States by Harold Remington (1915)
"Trustee's Duty to interpose It.—It is the trustee's duty to interpose it.92 § 786. As to Creditor Interposing It.—Any creditor otherwise qualified to defend ..."

3. The Poetical Works of John Dryden by John Dryden (1909)
"But let no alien S—dl—у interpose, To lard with wit thy hungry Epsom prose. And when false flowers of rhetoric thon wouldst cull, Trust nature, ..."

4. View of the State of Europe During the Middle Ages by Henry Hallam (1837)
"For many years the su- themselves entitled to interpose. But the | At the death of Otho III. without chil- spirit and even the institutions of the , dren, ..."

5. United States Supreme Court Reports by Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company, United States Supreme Court (1912)
"... fixed and he cannot be allowed to interpose collateral matters by way of defense. ... interpose ..."

6. The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States by Horace Greeley (1867)
"... interpose between him and them. Hooker moved at 4 p. м. ; and, making a long detour, crossed the Antietam out of sight and range of the Rebel batteries. ..."

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