Definition of Irritate

1. Verb. Cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations. "The performance is likely to irritate Sue"; "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"




2. Verb. Excite to an abnormal condition, or chafe or inflame. "Aspirin irritates my stomach"
Generic synonyms: Aggravate, Exacerbate, Exasperate, Worsen
Specialized synonyms: Chafe, Fret, Gall, Itch, Rub, Scratch
Derivative terms: Irritation, Irritation, Irritative
Antonyms: Soothe

3. Verb. Excite to some characteristic action or condition, such as motion, contraction, or nervous impulse, by the application of a stimulus. "Irritate the glands of a leaf"
Category relationships: Physiology
Generic synonyms: Excite, Stimulate
Specialized synonyms: Pinch, Vellicate
Derivative terms: Irritation, Irritative

Definition of Irritate

1. v. t. To render null and void.

2. v. t. To increase the action or violence of; to heighten excitement in; to intensify; to stimulate.

3. a. Excited; heightened.

Definition of Irritate

1. Verb. (transitive) To provoke impatience, anger, or displeasure. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive) To introduce irritability. ¹

3. Verb. (intransitive) To cause or induce displeasure or irritation. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive) To induce pain in (all or part of a body or organism). ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Irritate

1. to excite to impatience or anger [v -TATED, -TATING, -TATES]

Medical Definition of Irritate

1. 1. To increase the action or violence of; to heighten excitement in; to intensify; to stimulate. "Cold maketh the spirits vigorous and irritateth them." (Bacon) 2. To excite anger or displeasure in; to provoke; to tease; to exasperate; to annoy; to vex; as, the insolence of a tyrant irritates his subjects. "Dismiss the man, nor irritate the god: Prevent the rage of him who reigns above." (Pope) 3. To produce irritation in; to stimulate; to cause to contract. See Irritation. 4. To make morbidly excitable, or oversensitive; to fret; as, the skin is irritated by friction; to irritate a wound by a coarse bandage. Synonym: To fret, inflame, excite, provoke, tease, vex, exasperate, anger, incense, enrage. To Irritate, Provoke, Exasperate. These words express different stages of excited or angry feeling. Irritate denotes an excitement of quick and slightly angry feeling which is only momentary; as, irritated by a hasty remark. To provoke implies the awakening of some open expression of decided anger; as, a provoking insult. Exasperate denotes a provoking of anger at something unendurable. Whatever comes across our feelings irritates; whatever excites anger provokes; whatever raises anger to a high point exasperates. "Susceptible and nervous people are most easily irritated; proud people are quickly provoked; hot and fiery people are soonest exasperated." Origin: L. Irritatus, p. P. Of irritare. Of doubtful origin. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Irritate Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Irritate

irritable bowel syndrome
irritable breast
irritable colon
irritable heart
irritable mood
irritableness
irritablenesses
irritably
irritainment
irritancies
irritancy
irritant
irritant contact dermatitis
irritant eczema
irritants
irritate (current term)
irritated
irritates
irritating
irritatingly
irritation
irritation cell
irritation fibroma
irritations
irritative
irritator
irritators
irritatory
irrorate
irroration

Literary usage of Irritate

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Living Age by Making of America Project, Eliakim Littell, Robert S. Littell (1868)
""I have not said so; bat it certainly would not irritate me." " Well, and what do yon say now, Nelly?" asked he. She opened the letter after this and reac ..."

2. The Origin of Language and Nations: Hieroglyfically, Etymologically, and ...by Rowland Jones by Rowland Jones (1764)
"PROVOKE or irritate ... is from ir-tho-fi, it is putting one on fire; whence irritate. ... irritate ..."

3. A Cycle of Adams Letters, 1861-1865 by Charles Francis Adams, Henry Adams (1920)
"But our cue is still friendship, and we don't want to irritate. The strong outside pressure that is now aroused to act on this Government will, I hope, ..."

4. A Text-book of practical therapeutics: With Especial Reference to the by Hobart Amory Hare (1894)
"... in capsules or pills. • This dose may be given twice or thrice a day. The drug may irritate the stomach and kidneys when given in overdose. ..."

5. The Living Age by Making of America Project, Eliakim Littell, Robert S. Littell (1868)
""I have not said so; bat it certainly would not irritate me." " Well, and what do yon say now, Nelly?" asked he. She opened the letter after this and reac ..."

6. The Origin of Language and Nations: Hieroglyfically, Etymologically, and ...by Rowland Jones by Rowland Jones (1764)
"PROVOKE or irritate ... is from ir-tho-fi, it is putting one on fire; whence irritate. ... irritate ..."

7. A Cycle of Adams Letters, 1861-1865 by Charles Francis Adams, Henry Adams (1920)
"But our cue is still friendship, and we don't want to irritate. The strong outside pressure that is now aroused to act on this Government will, I hope, ..."

8. A Text-book of practical therapeutics: With Especial Reference to the by Hobart Amory Hare (1894)
"... in capsules or pills. • This dose may be given twice or thrice a day. The drug may irritate the stomach and kidneys when given in overdose. ..."

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