Definition of Kaleidoscope

1. Noun. A complex pattern of constantly changing colors and shapes.

Generic synonyms: Form, Pattern, Shape
Derivative terms: Kaleidoscopic, Kaleidoscopical



2. Noun. An optical toy in a tube; it produces symmetrical patterns as bits of colored glass are reflected by mirrors.
Generic synonyms: Plaything, Toy

Definition of Kaleidoscope

1. n. An instrument invented by Sir David Brewster, which contains loose fragments of colored glass, etc., and reflecting surfaces so arranged that changes of position exhibit its contents in an endless variety of beautiful colors and symmetrical forms. It has been much employed in arts of design.

Definition of Kaleidoscope

1. Noun. A tube of mirrors containing loose coloured beads etc. that is rotated to produce a succession of symmetrical designs ¹

2. Noun. A constantly changing set of colours, or other things ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Kaleidoscope

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Kaleidoscope

1. An instrument invented by Sir David Brewster, which contains loose fragments of coloured glass, etc, and reflecting surfaces so arranged that changes of position exhibit its contents in an endless variety of beautiful colours and symmetrical forms. It has been much employed in arts of design. "Shifting like the fragments of coloured glass in the kaleidoscope." (G. W. Cable) Origin: Gr. Beautiful + form + -scope. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Kaleidoscope

kalanchoes
kalans
kalansuwa
kalantas
kalarippayattu
kalasie
kalbi
kalborsite
kale
kalecilik
kaleege
kaleeges
kaleidophone
kaleidophones
kaleidoscope (current term)
kaleidoscopelike
kaleidoscopes
kaleidoscopic
kaleidoscopical
kaleidoscopically
kalelike
kalemia
kalendar
kalendarial
kalendars
kalends
kales
kalewife
kalewives

Literary usage of Kaleidoscope

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany (1818)
"the kaleidoscope. But we are far from imagining, that the distinguished inventor of this instrument has taken the idea from any of them. ..."

2. The Annals of Philosophy by Richard Phillips, E W Brayley (1818)
"Dr. Brewster's Patent kaleidoscope. From a Correspondent. FROM the great popularity of the kaleidoscope, attempts have been made to discover the principle ..."

3. Annals of Philosophy, Or, Magazine of Chemistry, Mineralogy, Mechanics by Thomas Thomson (1818)
"1 1 " » • Dr. Brewster's Patent kaleidoscope. From a Correspondent. FROM the great popularity of the kaleidoscope, attempts have been made to discover the ..."

4. Great Facts: A Popular History and Description of the Most Remarkable by Frederick Collier Bakewell (1860)
"No invention, on being first brought out, created so general a sensation as the kaleidoscope. Every person, who could buy or make one, had a kaleidoscope. ..."

5. Pan-Organizational Summit on the U.S. Science and Engineering Workforce by Marye Anne Fox, ( (2003)
"... and Engineering Workforce Jeanne L. Narum, Director Project kaleidoscope ... From experience with institutions active within Project kaleidoscope,1 we ..."

6. Lectures on Select Subjects in Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics by James Ferguson, David Brewster (1823)
"In the simple kaleidoscope the two reflectors may be fixed at a constant angle ... The utility of the kaleidoscope may be greatly Telescopic extended by the ..."

7. Travels Through Part of the United States and Canada in 1818 and 1819 by John Morison Duncan (1823)
"kaleidoscope JAIL. pleasant to both parties; but I thought that some incidental remarks ... The kaleidoscope became a topic of conversation after dinner; ..."

Other Resources:

Search for Kaleidoscope on Dictionary.com!Search for Kaleidoscope on Thesaurus.com!Search for Kaleidoscope on Google!Search for Kaleidoscope on Wikipedia!

Search