Definition of Midwife

1. Noun. A woman skilled in aiding the delivery of babies.

Exact synonyms: Accoucheuse
Generic synonyms: Nurse



Definition of Midwife

1. n. A woman who assists other women in childbirth; a female practitioner of the obstetric art.

2. v. t. To assist in childbirth.

3. v. i. To perform the office of midwife.

Definition of Midwife

1. Noun. A person, usually a woman, who is trained to assist women in childbirth, but who is not a physician. ¹

2. Noun. (rare figuratively) Someone who assists in bringing about some result or project. ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) To act as a midwife ¹

4. Verb. (transitive) (figuratively) to facilitate the emergence of ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Midwife

1. to assist a woman in childbirth [v -WIFED, -WIFING, -WIFES or -WIVED, -WIVING, -WIVES]

Medical Definition of Midwife

1. Origin: OE. Midwif, fr. AS. Mid with (akin to Gr) + woman, wife. Properly, the woman or wife who is attendant upon a woman in childbirth. See Meta-, and Wife. A woman who assists other women in childbirth; a female practitioner of the obstetric art. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Midwife Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Midwife

midvein
midverse
midward
midwatch
midwatches
midwater
midways
midweek
midweekly
midweeks
midweight
midwestern
midwestern united states
midwicket
midwife (current term)
midwife toad
midwifed
midwiferies
midwifery
midwifes
midwifing
midwinter
midwinters
midwive
midwived
midwives
midwiving
midyear
midyears

Literary usage of Midwife

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Immigrant Health and the Community by Michael Marks Davis (1921)
"Were there no foreign-born mothers there would be practically no midwife problem ... REASONS FOR USING THE midwife The reasons why the foreign born use ..."

2. Medical Record by George Frederick Shrady, Thomas Lathrop Stedman (1899)
"Both the cheapness and the availability of the midwife have contributed to make her ... The midwife then is preferred because she is more easily approached, ..."

3. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: “a” Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature edited by Hugh Chisholm (1911)
midwife of the first class has a superior status and can practise in any part ... In Italy a midwife must pass an examination and obtain a diploma from a ..."

4. Medical Men and the Law by Hugh Emmett Culbertson (1913)
"To say of a midwife that she is an ignorant woman and hath small practice, and is very unfortunate in her way, there are few but are sick or die under her ..."

5. Ecclesiastical Law by Richard Burn, Simon Fraser (1797)
"(/) IK order for the midwife's obtaining a licence, flie muft be recommended under the hands of matrons, who have experienced her flail; and alfo of the ..."

6. The Ecclesiastical Law by Richard Burn, Robert Phillimore (1842)
"In order for the midwife's obtaining a licence, she must be recommended under ... The oath to be administered to a midwife by the bishop or his chancellor, ..."

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