Definition of Obvert

1. v. t. To turn toward.



Definition of Obvert

1. Verb. To turn so as to show another side ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Obvert

1. to turn so as to show a different surface [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Obvert Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Obvert

obtusities
obtusity
obtustatin
obumbrant
obumbration
obumbrations
obv.
obvention
obventions
obversant
obverse
obversely
obverses
obversion
obversions
obvert (current term)
obverted
obverting
obverts
obvi
obviable
obviate
obviated
obviates
obviating
obviating(a)
obviation
obviations
obviative
obviatives

Literary usage of Obvert

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Logic and Argument by James Hervey Hyslop (1899)
"If we start with conversion, then obvert, and again try to convert, we shall find that we have an O proposition for the last process and we can proceed no ..."

2. An Elementary Logic by John Edward Russell (1906)
"(1) obvert a universal affirmative proposition by using a negative in both its terms. (2) obvert a universal negative by giving the subject term the form it ..."

3. An Elementary Handbook of Logic by John Joseph Toohey (1918)
"RULE: To obtain the inverse of A, obvert and convert alternately through four ... To obtain the partial inverse of A and E, obvert the inverse of A and E ..."

4. An Introductory Logic by James Edwin Creighton (1902)
"To obtain the converse of O /by contraposition, the rule given,_§.bove, first obvert and then convert simply, applies once more. ..."

5. The Essentials of Logic by Roy Wood Sellars (1917)
"The only way to interchange subject and predicate in the case of an O proposition is to obvert first and then convert. This double process is '. called ..."

6. A Manual of Logic by James Welton (1896)
"... we can obvert this to ^ uP which gives the simple inverse. ... which, by conversion, gives the inverse Si P; this we can obvert to So P. which is the ..."

7. Logic, Deductive and Inductive by Carveth Read (1898)
"To obvert affirmative propositions, then, the rule is—Add the negative sign to the copula, and for the predicate substitute its contradictory. ..."

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