Definition of Pedesis

1. Noun. The random motion of small particles suspended in a gas or liquid.

Exact synonyms: Brownian Motion, Brownian Movement
Generic synonyms: Motion, Movement



Definition of Pedesis

1. n. Same as Brownian movement, under Brownian.

Definition of Pedesis

1. Noun. Brownian motion ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Pedesis

1. a Brownian movement [n PEDESES]

Medical Definition of Pedesis

1. Synonym: brownian movement. Origin: G. Pedesis, a leaping (05 Mar 2000)

Pedesis Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Pedesis

peddleries
peddlers
peddlery
peddles
peddling
peddlings
pederasties
pederasts
pederero
pedereros
pedes
pedeses
pedesis (current term)
pedestal
pedestal fan
pedestal table
pedestaled
pedestaling
pedestalled
pedestalling
pedestals
pedestrial
pedestrian
pedestrian bridge
pedestrian crossing
pedestrian crossings
pedestrian precinct

Literary usage of Pedesis

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Annual Record of Science and Industry for 1871-78 by Spencer Fullerton Baird (1879)
"pedesis. Professor Stanly Jevons, in objecting to the names " Molecular movement," " Brownian ... suggests pedesis from the Greek—leaping, or bounding. ..."

2. Pharmaceutical Interrogations, a List of Classified Questions Upon Subjects by James Hartley Beal (1896)
"What is the so-called Brownian Movement or pedesis? 1087. How do you identify oil and air bubbles? 1088. How would you prepare and examine a section of ..."

3. Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society by Royal Microscopical Society, London (1878)
"Pure water exhibits pedesis in the highest perfection, even the air and carbonic acid ... The argument in the case of pedesis is, the Professor considers, ..."

4. The Journal of Science, and Annals of Astronomy, Biology, Geology by James Samuelson, William Crookes (1878)
"The fact is that the detergent action of soap is due to pedesis, by which minute particles are loosened and diffused through the water, so as to be readily ..."

5. The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (1892)
"pedesis had not received, as yet, any satisfactory explanation ; the only fai.'t which appeared to throw any light on its nature was that the addition of a ..."

6. A Practical Treatise on the Manufacture of Soap and Candles by Carl Deite, Alwin Engelhardt, Karl Schaedler (1888)
"Nearly all substances soluble in water have, it is claimed, the power of interrupting pedesis, which, according to .levons, explains the fact that 'Infilled ..."

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