Definition of Percussion

1. Noun. The act of playing a percussion instrument.

Generic synonyms: Music
Specialized synonyms: Drumming
Derivative terms: Percussionist



2. Noun. The act of exploding a percussion cap.
Generic synonyms: Detonation

3. Noun. The section of a band or orchestra that plays percussion instruments.
Exact synonyms: Percussion Section, Rhythm Section
Generic synonyms: Section
Derivative terms: Percussionist

4. Noun. Tapping a part of the body for diagnostic purposes.
Exact synonyms: Pleximetry
Generic synonyms: Auscultation
Derivative terms: Percuss

Definition of Percussion

1. n. The act of percussing, or striking one body against another; forcible collision, esp. such as gives a sound or report.

Definition of Percussion

1. Noun. the collision of two bodies in order to produce a sound ¹

2. Noun. the sound so produced ¹

3. Noun. the detonation of a percussion cap in a firearm ¹

4. Noun. (medicine) the tapping of the body as an aid to medical diagnosis ¹

5. Noun. (music) the section of an orchestra or band containing percussion instruments; such instruments considered as a group ¹

6. Noun. (engineering) the repeated striking of an object to break or shape it, as in percussion drilling ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Percussion

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Percussion

1. 1. The act of percussing, or striking one body against another; forcible collision, especially. Such as gives a sound or report. 2. Hence: The effect of violent collision; vibratory shock; impression of sound on the ear. "The thunderlike percussion of thy sounds." (Shak) 3. The act of tapping or striking the surface of the body in order to learn the condition of the parts beneath by the sound emitted or the sensation imparted to the fingers. Percussion is said to be immediate if the blow is directly upon the body; if some interventing substance, as a pleximeter, is, used, it is called mediate. Center of percussion. See Center. Percussion bullet, a bullet containing a substance which is exploded by percussion; an explosive bullet. Percussion cap, a small copper cap or cup, containing fulminating powder, and used with a percussion lock to explode gunpowder. Percussion fuze. See Fuze. Percussion lock, the lock of a gun that is fired by percussion upon fulminating powder. Percussion match, a match which ignites by percussion. Percussion powder, powder so composed as to ignite by slight percussion; fulminating powder. Percussion sieve, Percussion table, a machine for sorting ores by agitation in running water. Origin: L. Percussio: cf. F. Percussion. See Percuss. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Percussion Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Percussion

percolator
percolators
percolin
percolins
percomorph oil
percomorphi
percontation
percontative
percontatorial
percurrent
percursory
percuss
percussed
percusses
percussing
percussion (current term)
percussion cap
percussion section
percussion sound
percussion wave
percussionist
percussionists
percussions
percussive
percussive instrument
percussive maintenance
percussively
percussiveness
percussor

Literary usage of Percussion

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1878)
"I have, therefore, employed the percussion hammer, and the ordinary ones being found inadequate, T have constructed a special bone-hammer, ..."

2. The Practitioner by Gale Group, ProQuest Information and Learning Company (1903)
"IT will, I imagine, be readily admitted that of all the methods of physical examination, percussion is by far the most difficult to acquire and to interpret ..."

3. Encyclopaedia Britannica, a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and edited by Hugh Chisholm (1910)
"This trial established the percussion principle. The shooting was found to be more accurate, the recoil less, the charge of powder having been reduced from ..."

4. The Encyclopædia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and by Hugh Chisholm (1910)
"I.- to. j6. nearly in favour of the percussion system. In consequence of this successful trial the military Hint-lock in 1839 was altered to suit the ..."

5. Physical Diagnosis by Richard Clarke Cabot (1919)
"percussion. I. TECHNIQUE. There is no other method of physical examination which needs so much practice as percussion, and none that is so seldom thoroughly ..."

6. Monographic Medicine by William Robie Patten Emerson, Guido Guerrini, William Brown, Wendell Christopher Phillips, John Whitridge Williams, John Appleton Swett, Hans Günther, Mario Mariotti, Hugh Grant Rowell (1916)
"(e) percussion of the Skull percussion of the skull is of some value for clinical ... Increased sensitiveness on percussion, if sharply circumscribed, ..."

7. The Auk: Quarterly Journal of Ornithology by American Ornithologists' Union, Nuttall Ornithological Club (1876)
"Aeolian and percussion Bird Music.—The non-vocal forms of bird music, though not so widely distributed as those produced in the throat, are sufficiently ..."

8. A Dictionary of Science, Literature, & Art: Comprising the Definitions and by George William Cox (1866)
"percussion, Centre of. That point in a solid body revolving on an axis at which, ... The centre of percussion is in the straight line passing through the ..."

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