Definition of Perfection

1. Noun. The state of being without a flaw or defect.

Exact synonyms: Flawlessness, Ne Plus Ultra
Generic synonyms: State
Specialized synonyms: Dream, Cultivation, Culture, Finish, Polish, Refinement, Fare-thee-well, Intactness
Attributes: Perfect, Imperfect
Derivative terms: Flawless, Perfectionist
Antonyms: Imperfection



2. Noun. An ideal instance; a perfect embodiment of a concept.
Exact synonyms: Beau Ideal, Idol, Paragon
Generic synonyms: Ideal
Specialized synonyms: Gold Standard
Derivative terms: Idolise, Idolize, Perfectionist

3. Noun. The act of making something perfect.
Generic synonyms: Improvement
Derivative terms: Perfect, Perfectionist

Definition of Perfection

1. n. The quality or state of being perfect or complete, so that nothing requisite is wanting; entire development; consummate culture, skill, or moral excellence; the highest attainable state or degree of excellence; maturity; as, perfection in an art, in a science, or in a system; perfection in form or degree; fruits in perfection.

2. v. t. To perfect.

Definition of Perfection

1. Noun. The quality or state of being perfect or complete, so that nothing requisite is wanting; entire development; consummate culture, skill, or moral excellence; the highest attainable state or degree of excellence; maturity; as, '''perfection''' in an art, in a science, or in a system; '''perfection''' in form or degree; fruits in '''perfection'''. ¹

2. Noun. A quality, endowment, or acquirement completely excellent; an ideal; faultlessness; especially, the divine attribute of complete excellence. ¹

3. Noun. To '''perfection''', in the highest degree of excellence; perfectly; as, to imitate a model to '''perfection'''. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Perfection

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Perfection

1. 1. The quality or state of being perfect or complete, so that nothing requisite is wanting; entire development; consummate culture, skill, or moral excellence; the highest attainable state or degree of excellence; maturity; as, perfection in an art, in a science, or in a system; perfection in form or degree; fruits in perfection. 2. A quality, endowment, or acquirement completely excellent; an ideal faultlessness; especially, the divine attribute of complete excellence. "What tongue can her perfections tell?" (Sir P. Sidney) To perfection, in the highest degree of excellence; perfectly; as, to imitate a model to perfection. Origin: F. Perfection, L. Perfectio. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Perfection Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Perfection

perfected
perfecter
perfecters
perfectest
perfecti
perfectibilian
perfectibilians
perfectibilist
perfectibilists
perfectibilities
perfectibility
perfectible
perfecting
perfecting press
perfecting presses
perfection (current term)
perfectional
perfectionate
perfectionated
perfectionates
perfectionating
perfectionism
perfectionisms
perfectionist
perfectionistic
perfectionists
perfectionless
perfectionment
perfectionments
perfections

Literary usage of Perfection

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"It is true that faith and hope are prerequisites for perfection in this life, ... The other virtues therefore belong to perfection in a secondary and ..."

2. Kant's Kritik of Judgment by Immanuel Kant (1892)
"The judgment of taste is quite independent of the concept of perfection Objective purposiveness can only be cognised by means of the reference of the ..."

3. Library of the World's Best Literature: Ancient and Modern by Edward Cornelius Towne (1897)
"The second perfection of man consists in his becoming an actually ... This second perfection certainly does not include any action or good conduct, ..."

4. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or, The Preservation by Charles Darwin (1864)
"... species—Species with habits widely different from those of their allies— Organs of extreme perfection—Means of transition—Cases of difficulty—Natura non ..."

5. The Stones of Venice by John Ruskin (1873)
"Now all these parts of the human system have a reciprocal action on one another, so that the true perfection of any of them is not possible without some ..."

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