Definition of Plagium

1. n. Manstealing; kidnaping.



Definition of Plagium

1. Noun. (obsolete legal) kidnapping, especially of a child ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Plagium

1. the crime of kidnapping [n -S]

Plagium Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Plagium

plagioclase
plagioclases
plagioclasic
plagioclastic
plagioclimax
plagionite
plagiosere
plagioseres
plagiostomatous
plagiostome
plagiostomes
plagiostomi
plagiostomous
plagiotremata
plagiotropic
plagium (current term)
plagiums
plagose
plague
plague bacillus
plague pneumonia
plague septicaemia
plague spot
plague vaccine
plagued
plagueful
plagueless
plaguelike
plaguer
plaguers

Literary usage of Plagium

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Encyclopædia Americana: A Popular Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature edited by Francis Lieber, Edward Wigglesworth, Thomas Gamaliel Bradford, Henry Vethake (1851)
"plagium, in the Roman law, is the crime of stealing the slave of another, or of kidnapping a free person, in order to make him a slave. ..."

2. Studies in Roman Law, with Comparative Views of the Laws of France, England by Thomas Mackenzie Mackenzie (1865)
"This custom prevailed among the ancient Germans,5 and was incorporated as law in the provisions of the barbarian codes. plagium. ..."

3. Arguments and Decisions, in Remarkable Cases: Before the High Court of by John Maclaurin Dreghorn (1774)
"February 3. 1752. His MAJESTY'S ADVOCATE, AGAINST HELEN TORRENCE and JEAN WALDIE. plagium.—Murder.—Plea of pregnancy over-ruled on a report by mid~ wives. ..."

4. A Dictionary of American and English Law: With Definitions of the Technical by Stewart Rapalje, Robert Linn Lawrence (1888)
"... or confined, sold, gave, or bought a citizen (whether freeborn ora Creed- man), or the slave of another ; the offense being called plagium ..."

5. Digest of Cases Decided in the Supreme Courts of Scotland, from 1800 to 1842; by Patrick Shaw, Scotland Courts, Great Britain Parliament. House of Lords (1864)
"In plagium it is immaterial whether the child said to have been stolen have been taken away lucri faciendi causa or not. (5.) A panel convicted of the theft ..."

6. Encyclopædia Americana: A Popular Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature edited by Francis Lieber, Edward Wigglesworth, Thomas Gamaliel Bradford, Henry Vethake (1851)
"plagium, in the Roman law, is the crime of stealing the slave of another, or of kidnapping a free person, in order to make him a slave. ..."

7. Studies in Roman Law, with Comparative Views of the Laws of France, England by Thomas Mackenzie Mackenzie (1865)
"This custom prevailed among the ancient Germans,5 and was incorporated as law in the provisions of the barbarian codes. plagium. ..."

8. Arguments and Decisions, in Remarkable Cases: Before the High Court of by John Maclaurin Dreghorn (1774)
"February 3. 1752. His MAJESTY'S ADVOCATE, AGAINST HELEN TORRENCE and JEAN WALDIE. plagium.—Murder.—Plea of pregnancy over-ruled on a report by mid~ wives. ..."

9. A Dictionary of American and English Law: With Definitions of the Technical by Stewart Rapalje, Robert Linn Lawrence (1888)
"... or confined, sold, gave, or bought a citizen (whether freeborn ora Creed- man), or the slave of another ; the offense being called plagium ..."

10. Digest of Cases Decided in the Supreme Courts of Scotland, from 1800 to 1842; by Patrick Shaw, Scotland Courts, Great Britain Parliament. House of Lords (1864)
"In plagium it is immaterial whether the child said to have been stolen have been taken away lucri faciendi causa or not. (5.) A panel convicted of the theft ..."

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