Definition of Plaster

1. Noun. A mixture of lime or gypsum with sand and water; hardens into a smooth solid; used to cover walls and ceilings.




2. Verb. Apply a heavy coat to.
Exact synonyms: Plaster Over, Stick On
Generic synonyms: Cover
Derivative terms: Plastering

3. Noun. Any of several gypsum cements; a white powder (a form of calcium sulphate) that forms a paste when mixed with water and hardens into a solid; used in making molds and sculptures and casts for broken limbs.
Exact synonyms: Plaster Of Paris
Specialized synonyms: Gesso
Terms within: Gypsum
Generic synonyms: Calcium Sulfate, Calcium Sulphate

4. Verb. Cover conspicuously or thickly, as by pasting something on. "They plaster the doors with notices"; "She let the walls of the apartment be beplastered with stucco"
Exact synonyms: Beplaster
Generic synonyms: Cover

5. Noun. A medical dressing consisting of a soft heated mass of meal or clay that is spread on a cloth and applied to the skin to treat inflamed areas or improve circulation etc..
Exact synonyms: Cataplasm, Poultice
Generic synonyms: Dressing, Medical Dressing
Specialized synonyms: Mustard Plaster, Sinapism
Derivative terms: Poultice

6. Verb. Affix conspicuously. "They plaster notices on the doors"; "She plastered warnings all over the wall"
Generic synonyms: Affix, Stick On
Related verbs: Beplaster

7. Noun. A surface of hardened plaster (as on a wall or ceiling). "There were cracks in the plaster"
Exact synonyms: Plasterwork
Specialized synonyms: Pargeting, Pargetry, Pargetting
Generic synonyms: Surface

8. Verb. Apply a plaster cast to. "Plaster the broken arm"
Generic synonyms: Cover
Derivative terms: Plastering

9. Noun. Adhesive tape used in dressing wounds.
Exact synonyms: Adhesive Plaster, Sticking Plaster
Generic synonyms: Adhesive Tape
Specialized synonyms: Court Plaster

10. Verb. Coat with plaster. "Daub the wall"
Exact synonyms: Daub
Category relationships: Masonry
Generic synonyms: Coat, Surface
Related verbs: Daub
Specialized synonyms: Render-set, Parget, Roughcast, Mud, Mortar
Derivative terms: Daub, Daubing, Plasterer, Plastering

11. Verb. Dress by covering with a therapeutic substance. "Did he plaster his foot? "
Exact synonyms: Poultice
Category relationships: Medicine, Practice Of Medicine
Generic synonyms: Dress
Derivative terms: Plastering, Poultice

Definition of Plaster

1. n. An external application of a consistency harder than ointment, prepared for use by spreading it on linen, leather, silk, or other material. It is adhesive at the ordinary temperature of the body, and is used, according to its composition, to produce a medicinal effect, to bind parts together, etc.; as, a porous plaster; sticking plaster.

2. v. t. To cover with a plaster, as a wound or sore.

Definition of Plaster

1. Noun. A paste applied to the skin for healing or cosmetic purposes. ¹

2. Noun. (countable New Zealand British) A small adhesive bandage to cover a minor wound; a sticking plaster. ¹

3. Noun. A mixture of lime or gypsum, sand, and water, sometimes with the addition of fibres, that hardens to a smooth solid and is used for coating walls and ceilings. ¹

4. Noun. A cast made of plaster of Paris and gauze; plaster cast. ¹

5. Verb. (transitive) To cover or coat something with plaster, or apply a plaster. ¹

6. Verb. (transitive) To hide or cover up, as if with plaster. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Plaster

1. to cover with plaster (a mixture of lime, sand, and water) [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Plaster

1. 1. An external application of a consistency harder than ointment, prepared for use by spreading it on linen, leather, silk, or other material. It is adhesive at the ordinary temperature of the body, and is used, according to its composition, to produce a medicinal effect, to bind parts together, etc.; as, a porous plaster; sticking plaster. 2. A composition of lime, water, and sand, with or without hair as a bond, for coating walls, ceilings, and partitions of houses. See Mortar. 3. Calcined gypsum, or plaster of Paris, especially when ground, as used for making ornaments, figures, moldings, etc.; or calcined gypsum used as a fertiliser. Plaster cast, a copy of an object obtained by pouring plaster of Paris mixed with water into a mold. Plaster of Paris. [So called because originally brought from a suburb of Paris. A bandage saturated with a paste of plaster of Paris, which on drying forms a perfectly fitting splint. Plaster stone, any species of gypsum. See Gypsum. Origin: AS, a plaster (in sense 1), fr. L. Emplastrum, Gr, fr. To daub on, stuff in; in + to mold: cf. OF. Plastre a plaster (in sense 2), F. Platre. Cf. Plastic, Emplaster, Piaster] [Formerly written also plaister. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Plaster

plasmonics
plasmons
plasmorrhexis
plasmoschisis
plasmosin
plasmotomy
plasmotropic
plasmotropism
plasmotype
plasmozyme
plasms
plast
plaste
plastein
plaster (current term)
plaster bandage
plaster cast
plaster casts
plaster of Paris
plaster of Paris disease
plaster over
plaster saint
plaster splint
plasterboard
plasterboarded
plasterboarding
plasterboards
plastered
plasterer

Literary usage of Plaster

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Proceedings by Philadelphia County Medical Society (1896)
"As to the use of plaster-of-Paris in the treatment of fractures, there is not a bone in the body, except the skull, that he has not applied that to. ..."

2. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1862)
"But the plaster of Paris casing allows the anterior surface of the limb to be ... Fine, well dried, white plaster had better be selected, and before using a ..."

3. The Potter's Craft: A Practical Guide for the Studio and Workshop by Charles Fergus Binns (1910)
"Even if one does not use molds there are numberless purposes for which plaster is convenient. For stiffening slip into clay, and for absorbing water from ..."

4. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1911)
"It is better to look upon it in the first place as a colour-finish to plaster-work. What it produces is a. coloured surface of a certain quality of texture ..."

5. Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetrics by The American College of Surgeons, Franklin H. Martin Memorial Foundation (1921)
"We then begin the application of the plaster bandages. In order to make the jacket very strong and to reduce the time occupied in applying it, it is helpful ..."

6. Proceedings by Philadelphia County Medical Society (1896)
"As to the use of plaster-of-Paris in the treatment of fractures, there is not a bone in the body, except the skull, that he has not applied that to. ..."

7. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1862)
"But the plaster of Paris casing allows the anterior surface of the limb to be ... Fine, well dried, white plaster had better be selected, and before using a ..."

8. The Potter's Craft: A Practical Guide for the Studio and Workshop by Charles Fergus Binns (1910)
"Even if one does not use molds there are numberless purposes for which plaster is convenient. For stiffening slip into clay, and for absorbing water from ..."

9. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1911)
"It is better to look upon it in the first place as a colour-finish to plaster-work. What it produces is a. coloured surface of a certain quality of texture ..."

10. Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetrics by The American College of Surgeons, Franklin H. Martin Memorial Foundation (1921)
"We then begin the application of the plaster bandages. In order to make the jacket very strong and to reduce the time occupied in applying it, it is helpful ..."

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