Definition of Prescind

1. v. t. To cut off; to abstract.



Definition of Prescind

1. Verb. To cut off, detach or separate something ¹

2. Verb. To think about multiple things individually ¹

3. Verb. To stop thinking about something ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Prescind

1. to consider separately [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Lexicographical Neighbors of Prescind

prescheduled
preschedules
prescheduling
preschool
preschooled
preschooler
preschoolers
preschooling
preschools
prescience
presciences
prescient
prescientific
prescientifically
presciently
prescind (current term)
prescinded
prescinding
prescinds
prescious
prescore
prescored
prescores
prescoring
prescreen
prescreened
prescreening
prescreens
prescribe
prescribed

Literary usage of Prescind

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Walker's Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and Expositor of the English by John Walker (1823)
"... pro'she-6nt. a. foreknowing prescind, pre-s'nd'. «. a. to cut off Prescribe, pre-skribe'. ra to order, to direct Prescript, pre'skript. i. direction, ..."

2. The Monist by Hegeler Institute (1905)
"But whether it was the invention or the courage of our philosophical ancestors which exhausted itself in the manufacture of the verb "prescind," the curious ..."

3. General Metaphysics by John Rickaby (1890)
"Not to dwell at present on the several sorts of analogy, we will ask at once, does Being refuse to allow us fully to prescind it from its differences ? ..."

4. Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic by William Hamilton (1860)
"To prescind, to attend, and to abstract, are merely different but ... When we are said to prescind a quality, we are merely supposed to attend to that ..."

5. The London Encyclopaedia, Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art by Thomas Tegg (1829)
"prescind>. a. 1 Lat. pasando. To A bare act of obliquity does not only prescind from, but positively deny such a special dependence. ..."

6. The Logic of Sir William Hamilton, Bart.: Reduced and Prepared for Use in by William Hamilton, Henry Noble Day (1863)
"To prescind, to attend, and to abstract, are merely different but ... When we are said to prescind a quality, we are merely supposed to attend to that ..."

7. The Student's Handbook of Philosophy: Psychology by Benjamin Franklin Cocker (1882)
"In technical language, we are said to prescind the phenomena which we exclusively ... To prescind, to attend, and to abstract, are merely different but ..."

Other Resources:

Search for Prescind on Dictionary.com!Search for Prescind on Thesaurus.com!Search for Prescind on Google!Search for Prescind on Wikipedia!

Search