Definition of Prodigy

1. Noun. An unusually gifted or intelligent (young) person; someone whose talents excite wonder and admiration. "She is a chess prodigy"




2. Noun. A sign of something about to happen. "He looked for an omen before going into battle"

3. Noun. An impressive or wonderful example of a particular quality. "The Marines are expected to perform prodigies of valor"
Generic synonyms: Example, Exemplar, Good Example, Model
Derivative terms: Prodigious

Definition of Prodigy

1. n. Something extraordinary, or out of the usual course of nature, from which omens are drawn; a portent; as, eclipses and meteors were anciently deemed prodigies.

Definition of Prodigy

1. Noun. (archaic) Something from which omens are drawn. ¹

2. Noun. An amazing or marvellous thing. ¹

3. Noun. A wonderful example of something. ¹

4. Noun. An extremely talented person, especially a child. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Prodigy

1. a child having exceptional talent or ability [n -GIES]

Prodigy Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Prodigy

prodigality
prodigalize
prodigalized
prodigalizes
prodigalizing
prodigally
prodigalness
prodigals
prodigate
prodigence
prodigies
prodigiosin
prodigious
prodigiously
prodigiousness
prodigy (current term)
prodine
prodition
proditions
proditor
proditorious
proditoriously
proditors
proditory
prodnose
prodnosed
prodnoses
prodroma
prodromal
prodromata

Literary usage of Prodigy

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Popular Science Monthly (1893)
"MATHEMATICIANS, doctors, and philosophers have lately enjoyed a rare opportunity to study a new calculating prodigy, a young man twenty-four years old, ..."

2. Brief Outline of an Analysis of the Human Intellect: Intended to Rectify the by James Rush (1865)
"Of the Partial Working Plan of the Mental prodigy. We call a prodigy, that uncommon phenomenon of Nature, which, if not directed by a ..."

3. A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1901)
"prodigy Problem. (F.-L.-Gk.) o. vpo, forward ; \4v, to cast. forward as a question for discussion, ... •prodigy. (F.-L.) Englished from F. probity. ..."

4. Wagner and His Works: The Story of His Life, with Critical Comments by Henry Theophilus Finck (1893)
"RICHARD NOT A prodigy — AND WHY Most of the great composers have ... Wagner, by his own confession, was not a prodigy; and when his operas began to make ..."

5. The Metropolitan (1844)
"THE INFANT prodigy. BY MRS. ABDY. SURPRISING ! what qualities solid and bright In this dazzling diminutive wonder unite ! She sings German melodies, ..."

6. The Life of Marcus Tullius Cicero by Conyers Middleton (1818)
"the traitors, when his wife came in all haste to inform him of a prodigy which ... It is not impossible, that this pretended prodigy was projected between ..."

7. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (1887)
"... and sentiment, aud divine power.13 For the truth of this prodigy he appeals to the public monuments of the city; and censures, with some acrimony, ..."

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