Definition of Recess

1. Noun. A state of abeyance or suspended business.

Exact synonyms: Deferral
Generic synonyms: Abeyance, Suspension



2. Verb. Put into a recess. "Recess lights"
Generic synonyms: Lay, Place, Pose, Position, Put, Set

3. Noun. A small concavity.
Exact synonyms: Corner, Niche, Recession
Specialized synonyms: Pharyngeal Recess
Generic synonyms: Concave Shape, Concavity, Incurvation, Incurvature
Derivative terms: Corner

4. Verb. Make a recess in. "Recess the piece of wood"
Generic synonyms: Indent

5. Noun. An arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands).
Exact synonyms: Inlet
Generic synonyms: Body Of Water, Water
Specialized synonyms: Bristol Channel, Gulf Of Aegina, Saronic Gulf, White Sea, Zuider Zee
Specialized synonyms: Cove, Fiord, Fjord, Loch
Group relationships: Lake, Sea

6. Verb. Close at the end of a session. "The court adjourned"
Exact synonyms: Adjourn, Break Up
Generic synonyms: Cease, End, Finish, Stop, Terminate
Derivative terms: Adjournment

7. Noun. An enclosure that is set back or indented.
Exact synonyms: Niche
Specialized synonyms: Alcove, Bay, Apse, Apsis, Cinerarium, Columbarium, Fireplace, Hearth, Open Fireplace, Mihrab
Generic synonyms: Enclosure

8. Noun. A pause from doing something (as work). "He took time out to recuperate"
Exact synonyms: Break, Respite, Time Out
Generic synonyms: Pause
Specialized synonyms: Spring Break
Derivative terms: Break

Definition of Recess

1. n. A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; retreat; as, the recess of the tides.

2. v. t. To make a recess in; as, to recess a wall.

3. n. A decree of the imperial diet of the old German empire.

Definition of Recess

1. Noun. (countable or uncountable) A break, pause or vacation. ¹

2. Noun. An inset, hole, space or opening. ¹

3. Noun. (American English) A time of play, usually, on a playground. ¹

4. Verb. To inset into something, or to recede. ¹

5. Verb. (intransitive) To take or declare a break. ¹

6. Adjective. (obsolete rare) Remote, distant (in time or place). ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Recess

1. to place in a receding space or hollow [v -ED, -ING, -ES]

Medical Definition of Recess

1. 1. A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; retreat; as, the recess of the tides. "Every degree of ignorance being so far a recess and degradation from rationality." (South) "My recess hath given them confidence that I may be conquered." (Eikon Basilike) 2. The state of being withdrawn; seclusion; privacy. "In the recess of the jury they are to consider the evidence." (Sir M. Hale) "Good verse recess and solitude requires." (Dryden) 3. Remission or suspension of business or procedure; intermission, as of a legislative body, court, or school. "The recess of . . . Parliament lasted six weeks." (Macaulay) 4. Part of a room formed by the receding of the wall, as an alcove, niche, etc. "A bed which stood in a deep recess." (W. Irving) 5. A place of retirement, retreat, secrecy, or seclusion. "Departure from his happy place, our sweet Recess, and only consolation left." (Milton) 6. Secret or abstruse part; as, the difficulties and recesses of science. 7. A sinus. Origin: L. Recessus, fr. Recedere, recessum. See Recede. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Recess Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Recess Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Recess

receptor site
receptor tyrosine kinase
receptories
receptors
receptory
receptosome
receptosomes
receptour
recepts
recertification
recertifications
recertified
recertifies
recertify
recertifying
recess (current term)
recess appointment
recess appointments
recessed
recesses
recessing
recession
recessional
recessional march
recessionals
recessionary
recessionista
recessionistas
recessionlike
recessionproof

Literary usage of Recess

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge: Embracing by Johann Jakob Herzog, Philip Schaff, Albert Hauck (1909)
"The introduction of the recess attempts to refute the reproaches of the Roman Catholics that the Evangelicals disagreed among themselves. ..."

2. The Age of the Reformation by Preserved Smith (1920)
"The Diet which met at Spires early in 1529 endeav- recess e ored to deal as drastically as possible with the schism, i^3' The recess passed by the Catholic ..."

3. Journal by Indiana General Assembly. Senate, Indiana, General Assembly, United States Congress Senate (1908)
"Page Moves Senate take recess 35 recess : Motion for prevails 36 Offers Senate Resolution No. 9 requesting Information of the governor concerning night ..."

4. Allen's Synonyms and Antonyms by Frederic Sturges Allen (1920)
"recess, n. 1. See INTERVAL, RETREAT, recessION, INTERIOR, INLET. ... 2, niche;—to put in a recess. recessive, a. regressive, retrogressive; see BACKWARD. ..."

5. Constitution, Jefferson's Manual, the Rules of the House of Representatives by United States Congress. House, Thomas Jefferson, United States (1904)
"Pending a motion to suspend the rules a motion for a recess is not in order. ... When the hour previously fixed for a recess arrives the Chair declares the ..."

6. How Our Laws Are Made by Charles W. Johnson (1999)
"recess AUTHORITY The House may by vote authorize the Speaker to declare a recess ... The Speaker also has the authority to declare the House in recess for a ..."

7. Judicial and Statutory Definitions of Words and Phrases by West Publishing Company (1904)
"1n the clause of the Constitution, providing that the Governor shall have power to fill up vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Legislature, ..."

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