Definition of Rockslides

1. Noun. (plural of rockslide) ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Rockslides

1. rockslide [n] - See also: rockslide

Lexicographical Neighbors of Rockslides

rockoon
rockoons
rockpile
rockpiles
rockrose
rockrose family
rockroses
rocks along
rocksalt
rockscape
rockscapes
rockshaft
rockshafts
rockslide
rockslides (current term)
rockstar
rockstardom
rockstars
rocksteady
rocksucker
rocksuckers
rockumentaries
rockumentary
rockweed
rockweeds
rockwood
rockwork
rockworks
rocky

Literary usage of Rockslides

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Technical World Magazine (1912)
"Plenty of Himalaya rockslides quite as extensive as this, have been recorded in the last half century, while among the remote and uninhabited regions of the ..."

2. Report by United States Board on Geographic Names, United States Geographic Board (1916)
"... Militia District and Village, Polk County, Ga. (Not Rock Mart.) rockslides; Slope, forming a portion of the north side of ..."

3. An Introduction to Geology by William Berryman Scott (1914)
"A striking example of this was given by the earthquakes of northwestern Greece in 1870, in which the rockslides were on a gigantic scale. ..."

4. Environmental Theology by Richard Cartwright Austin (1990)
"... rockslides from the strip mines high above them and also by rising water that rushed from the denuded hills through creekbeds choked with debris. ..."

5. The California earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the state earthquake by Andrew Cowper Lawson, Harry Fielding Reid (1908)
"The ridge its whole length is shattered and broken, and, as before said, marked by innumerable rockslides. The rather steep slopes appear to move every wet ..."

6. The California Earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake by Andrew Cowper Lawson, Harry Fielding Reid (1908)
"The ridge its whole length is shattered and broken, and, as before said, marked by innumerable rockslides. The rather steep slopes appear to move every wet ..."

7. Memoirs of the New York Botanical Garden by New York Botanical Garden (1900)
"Evidently perfectly distinct from the European JE. acris L. It grows among rockslides, at an altitude of 2000—3000 m. MONTANA: Spanish Basin, June 28, 1897, ..."

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