Definition of Rubble

1. Noun. The remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up.

Exact synonyms: Debris, Detritus, Dust, Junk
Generic synonyms: Rubbish, Scrap, Trash
Specialized synonyms: Slack
Derivative terms: Dust, Junk



Definition of Rubble

1. n. Water-worn or rough broken stones; broken bricks, etc., used in coarse masonry, or to fill up between the facing courses of walls.

Definition of Rubble

1. Noun. The broken remains of an object, usually rock or masonry. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Rubble

1. to reduce to rubble (broken pieces) [v -BLED, -BLING, -BLES]

Medical Definition of Rubble

1. 1. Water-worn or rough broken stones; broken bricks, etc, used in coarse masonry, or to fill up between the facing courses of walls. "Inside [the wall] there was rubble or mortar." (Jowett (Thucyd)) 2. Rough stone as it comes from the quarry; also, a quarryman's term for the upper fragmentary and decomposed portion of a mass of stone; brash. 3. A mass or stratum of fragments or rock lying under the alluvium, and derived from the neighboring rock. 4. The whole of the bran of wheat before it is sorted into pollard, bran, etc. Coursed rubble, rubble masonry in which courses are formed by leveling off the work at certain heights. Origin: From an assumed Old French dim. Of robe See Rubbish. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Rubble

rubbingly
rubbings
rubbish-bin
rubbish bin
rubbish bins
rubbish dump
rubbish heap
rubbished
rubbisher
rubbishers
rubbishes
rubbishing
rubbishy
rubbit
rubble (current term)
rubbled
rubbles
rubblestone
rubblework
rubblier
rubbliest
rubbling
rubbly
rubboard
rubboards
rubby
rubby-dub
rubdown
rubdowns

Literary usage of Rubble

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1910)
"There are three distinct types of breakwaters:—(i) A simple rubble or concrete-block mound; (2) a mound for the bottom portion, surmounted on the top by a ..."

2. Report of the Annual Meeting (1904)
"The presence of the land-shells proves that the rubble is a sub-aerial rain-wash, ... The Chalk-rubble at Sewerby contains many small pieces of flint, ..."

3. A Treatise on Masonry Construction by Ira Osborn Baker (1889)
"Laid in 1 to 2 mortar, ordinary rubble requires from one half to one barrel ... rubble masonry of the quality described above is frequently employed for the ..."

4. A Manual of Civil Engineering by William John Macquorn Rankine, William J. Millar (1907)
"Coursed rubble is used for retaining walls and wing-walls that require less strength than those built of block-in-course or ashlar, for the backing of ..."

5. A Treatise on Masonry Construction by Ira Osborn Baker (1889)
"Laid in 1 to 2 mortar, ordinary rubble requires from one half to one barrel of cement per cubic yard of masonry. For the amount of cement and sand required ..."

6. An Elementary Course of Civil Engineering by Joseph Mathieu Sganzin (1828)
"rubble Work, Bricks, Pise. By the name of rubble* we designate stones of a small size and without any regular form, which are used for filling up the ..."

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