Definition of Rummage

1. Noun. A jumble of things to be given away.




2. Verb. Search haphazardly. "We rummaged through the drawers"
Generic synonyms: Search

3. Noun. A thorough search for something (often causing disorder or confusion). "He gave the attic a good rummage but couldn't find his skis"
Exact synonyms: Ransacking
Generic synonyms: Hunt, Hunting, Search
Derivative terms: Ransack

Definition of Rummage

1. n. A place or room for the stowage of cargo in a ship; also, the act of stowing cargo; the pulling and moving about of packages incident to close stowage; -- formerly written romage.

2. v. t. To make room in, as a ship, for the cargo; to move about, as packages, ballast, so as to permit close stowage; to stow closely; to pack; -- formerly written roomage, and romage.

3. v. i. To search a place narrowly.

Definition of Rummage

1. Verb. (transitive nautical) to arrange (cargo, goods, etc.) in the hold of a ship; to move or rearrange such goods. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive nautical) to search a vessel for smuggled goods. ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) to search something which contains many items hastily by carelessly turning things over or pushing things aside. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive) to search something thoroughly and with disregard for the way in which things were arranged ¹

5. Verb. (intransitive) to hastily search for something in a confined space and among many items by carelessly turning things over or pushing things aside. ¹

6. Noun. (obsolete) commotion; disturbance ¹

7. Noun. a thorough search, usually resulting in a disorder ¹

8. Noun. an unorganized collection of miscellaneous objects; a jumble ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Rummage

1. to search thoroughly through [v -MAGED, -MAGING, -MAGES]

Medical Definition of Rummage

1. 1. To make room in, as a ship, for the cargo; to move about, as packages, ballast, so as to permit close stowage; to stow closely; to pack; formerly written roomage, and romage. "They night bring away a great deal more than they do, if they would take pain in the romaging." (Hakluyt) 2. To search or examine thoroughly by looking into every corner, and turning over or removing goods or other things; to examine, as a book, carefully, turning over leaf after leaf. "He . . . Searcheth his pockets, and taketh his keys, and so rummageth all his closets and trunks." (Howell) "What schoolboy of us has not rummaged his Greek dictionary in vain for a satisfactory account!" (M. Arnold) Origin: Rummaged; Rummaging. 1. A place or room for the stowage of cargo in a ship; also, the act of stowing cargo; the pulling and moving about of packages incident to close stowage; formerly written romage. 2. A searching carefully by looking into every corner, and by turning things over. "He has such a general rummage and reform in the office of matrimony." (Walpole) Rummage sale, a clearance sale of unclaimed goods in a public store, or of odds and ends which have accumulated in a shop. Origin: For roomage, fr. Room; hence originally, a making room, a packing away closely. See Room. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Rummage Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Rummage

ruminates
ruminating
ruminatingly
rumination
rumination disorder
ruminations
ruminative
ruminatively
ruminator
ruminators
ruminococcin
ruminoreticulum
rumkin
rumkins
rumly
rummage (current term)
rummage sale
rummage sales
rummaged
rummager
rummagers
rummages
rummaging
rummer
rummers
rummest
rummier
rummies
rummiest
rummily

Literary usage of Rummage

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Complete Works of Gustave Flaubert: Embracing Romances, Travels by Gustave Flaubert, Ferdinand Brunetière (1904)
"A nauseous curiosity made them rummage all the dressing-rooms, all the recesses. Returned convicts thrust their arms into the beds in which princesses had ..."

2. A Treatise on the Law of Evidence as Administered in England and Ireland by John Pitt Taylor (1887)
"... produce of " rummage sales," and that afterwards, by some means which were not miraculous but fraudulent, the wine had been converted into "sound port. ..."

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