Definition of Sanguine

1. Noun. A blood-red color.

Generic synonyms: Red, Redness
Derivative terms: Sanguineous



2. Adjective. Confidently optimistic and cheerful.
Similar to: Optimistic
Derivative terms: Sanguineness, Sanguinity

3. Adjective. Inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life. "A fresh and sanguine complexion"
Exact synonyms: Florid, Rubicund, Ruddy
Similar to: Healthy
Derivative terms: Ruddiness

Definition of Sanguine

1. a. Having the color of blood; red.

2. n. Blood color; red.

3. v. t. To stain with blood; to impart the color of blood to; to ensanguine.

Definition of Sanguine

1. Adjective. Having the colour of blood; red. ¹

2. Adjective. (obsolete physiology) Having a bodily constitution characterised by a preponderance of blood over the other bodily humours, thought to be marked by irresponsible mirth; indulgent in pleasure to the exclusion of important matters. ¹

3. Adjective. Characterized by abundance and active circulation of blood. ¹

4. Adjective. Warm; ardent. ¹

5. Adjective. Anticipating the best; optimistic; not despondent; confident; full of hope. ¹

6. Noun. Blood colour; red. ¹

7. Noun. Anything of a blood-red colour, as cloth. ¹

8. Noun. Bloodstone. ¹

9. Noun. Red crayon. See the Note under crayon, 1. ¹

10. Verb. To stain with blood; to impart the colour of blood to; to ensanguine. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sanguine

1. a red color [n -S]

Medical Definition of Sanguine

1. 1. Having the colour of blood; red. "Of his complexion he was sanguine." (Chaucer) "Like to that sanguine flower inscribed with woe." (Milton) 2. Characterised by abundance and active circulation of blood; as, a sanguine bodily temperament. 3. Warm; ardent; as, a sanguine temper. 4. Anticipating the best; not desponding; confident; full of hope; as, sanguine of success. Synonym: Warm, ardent, lively, confident, hopeful. Origin: F. Sanguin, L. Sanguineus, fr. Sanguis blood. Cf. Sanguineous. To stain with blood; to impart the colour of blood to; to ensanguine. 1. Blood colour; red. 2. Anything of a blood-red, as cloth. "In sanguine and in pes he clad was all." (Chaucer) 3. Bloodstone. 4. Red crayon. See the Note under Crayon. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Sanguine Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sanguine

sanguifies
sanguifluous
sanguify
sanguifying
sanguigenous
sanguinaceous
sanguinaria
sanguinarian
sanguinarians
sanguinarias
sanguinarily
sanguinarine
sanguinariness
sanguinary
sanguinary ant
sanguine (current term)
sanguined
sanguineless
sanguinely
sanguineness
sanguinenesses
sanguineous
sanguineous cyst
sanguines
sanguining
sanguinities
sanguinity
sanguinivorous
sanguinolency
sanguinolent

Literary usage of Sanguine

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Punch by Mark Lemon, Henry Mayhew, Tom Taylor, Shirley Brooks, Francis Cowley Burnand, Owen Seaman (1879)
"Enter a sanguine Indian Secretary. sanguine Indian Secretary (holding out telegram]. ... sanguine Indian Secretary. Oh, there 's a whole lot of it. ..."

2. The Philosophy of Living: Or, The Way to Enjoy Life and Its Comforts by Caleb Ticknor (1836)
"The sanguine Temperament, Activity of the heart and arteries and the whole circulatory system, and a rapid formation of blood when this fluid has been ..."

3. The Novels of Jane Austen by Jane Austen (1892)
"She spoke of her farther as somewhat delicate and puny, but was sanguine in the hope of her being materially better for change of air. ..."

4. Punch by Mark Lemon, Henry Mayhew, Tom Taylor, Shirley Brooks, Francis Cowley Burnand, Owen Seaman (1879)
"Enter a sanguine Indian Secretary. sanguine Indian Secretary (holding out telegram]. ... sanguine Indian Secretary. Oh, there 's a whole lot of it. ..."

5. The Philosophy of Living: Or, The Way to Enjoy Life and Its Comforts by Caleb Ticknor (1836)
"The sanguine Temperament, Activity of the heart and arteries and the whole circulatory system, and a rapid formation of blood when this fluid has been ..."

6. The Novels of Jane Austen by Jane Austen (1892)
"She spoke of her farther as somewhat delicate and puny, but was sanguine in the hope of her being materially better for change of air. ..."

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