Definition of Schooner

1. Noun. A large beer glass.

Generic synonyms: Drinking Glass, Glass



2. Noun. Sailing vessel used in former times.
Generic synonyms: Sailing Ship, Sailing Vessel
Specialized synonyms: Sharpshooter

Definition of Schooner

1. n. Originally, a small, sharp-built vessel, with two masts and fore-and-aft rig. Sometimes it carried square topsails on one or both masts and was called a topsail schooner. About 1840, longer vessels with three masts, fore-and- aft rigged, came into use, and since that time vessels with four masts and even with six masts, so rigged, are built. Schooners with more than two masts are designated three-masted schooners, four- masted schooners, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.

2. n. A large goblet or drinking glass, -- used for lager beer or ale.

Definition of Schooner

1. Noun. (nautical) A sailing ship with two or more masts, all with fore-and-aft sails; if two masted, having a foremast and a mainmast. There are variants, such as additional square sails on the fore topmast. Compare ketch and yawl which have a main and a mizzen mast. ¹

2. Noun. (Australia) A glass of beer. Size varies by state, but it is typically one of the larger measures, except in South Australia; see Beer in Australia: Beer glasses for details. ¹

3. Noun. (American English) A large goblet or drinking glass, used for lager or ale. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Schooner

1. a sailing vessel [n -S]

Medical Definition of Schooner

1. Originally, a small, sharp-built vessel, with two topsails on one or both masts and was called a topsail schooner. About 1840, longer vesels with three masts, fore-and-aft rigged, came into use, and since that time vesels with four masts and even with six masts, so rigged, are built. Schooners with more than two masts are designated three-masted schooners, four-masted schooners, etc. The fist schooner ever constructed is said to have between built in Gloucester, Massachusetts, about theyar 1713, by a Captain Andrew Robinson, and to have received its name from the following trivial circumstance: When the vessel went off the stocks into the water, a bystander cried out,"O, how she scoons!" Robinson replied, " A scooner let her be;" and, from that time, vessels thus masted and rigged have gone by this name. The word scoon is popularly used in some parts of new England to denote the act of making stones skip along the surface of water. The Scottish scon means the same thing. Both words are probably allied to the Icel. Skunda, skynda, to make haste, hurry, AS. Scunian to avoid, shun, Prov. E. Scun. In the New England records, the word appears to have been originally written scooner. Babson, in his "History of Gloucester," gives the following extract from a letter written in that place Sept. 25, 1721, by Dr. Moses Prince, brother of the Rev. Thomas Prince, the annalist of New England: "This gentleman (Captain Robinson) was first contriver of schooners, and built the first of that sort about eight years since." See: the Note below. Cf. Shun. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Schooner Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Schooner

schoolteacherly
schoolteachers
schoolteaching
schooltime
schooltimes
schoolward
schoolwards
schoolwear
schoolwide
schoolwise
schoolwork
schoolworks
schooly
schoolyard
schoolyards
schooner (current term)
schoonerite
schooners
schorl
schorlaceous
schorlous
schorls
schorly
schottische
schottisches
schout
schouts
schradan
schrecklichkeit
schreibersite

Literary usage of Schooner

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. United States Supreme Court Reports by Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company, United States Supreme Court (1885)
"D. 8. 637 ; 85 U ei D. 8. 468. »8 vessel tn proximity on ber larboard or starboard side. 2. It was the duty of the steamer to see the schooner as ..."

2. Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review by William B. Dana (1858)
"8 60, sales §1037 f)G, salvage §22734 00 ; schooner Ottawa, Seaman, Cardenas for Boston, leaking, had been ashore on the Cuba Coast, value vessel §5.000, ..."

3. The Gentleman's Magazine (1861)
"During the past year the LI*P BOATS of the Institution have been Instrumental in rescuing the Crews of the following wrecked Vessels :— schooner Ann ..."

4. The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives by Frank Moore, Edward Everett (1862)
"THE following particulars of the capture of ' the schooner is taken from a letter dated ... While disembarking, we discovered a schooner with all sail set, ..."

5. Report on Epidemic Cholera and Yellow Fever in the Army of the United States by United States Surgeon-General's Office (1868)
"May 6th, American schooner Prince of Wales, Matanzas, ballast. ... May 27th, American schooner Christopher Pendleton, Sagua La Grande, molasses. ..."

6. An American Glossary by Richard Hopwood Thornton (1912)
"Prairie schooner—contd. 1910 The next schooner I had any association with was that venerable and faithful prairie schooner that floated so bravely and ..."

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