Definition of Spite

1. Noun. Feeling a need to see others suffer.

Exact synonyms: Malice, Maliciousness, Spitefulness, Venom
Generic synonyms: Malevolence, Malignity
Derivative terms: Malicious, Malicious, Spiteful, Venomous



2. Verb. Hurt the feelings of. "Sam cannot spite Sue "; "This remark really bruised my ego"
Exact synonyms: Bruise, Hurt, Injure, Offend, Wound
Specialized synonyms: Affront, Diss, Insult, Lacerate, Sting, Abase, Chagrin, Humble, Humiliate, Mortify
Generic synonyms: Arouse, Elicit, Enkindle, Evoke, Fire, Kindle, Provoke, Raise
Derivative terms: Offence, Offense, Offensive, Offensive

3. Noun. Malevolence by virtue of being malicious or spiteful or nasty.
Exact synonyms: Bitchiness, Cattiness, Nastiness, Spitefulness
Generic synonyms: Malevolence, Malevolency, Malice
Derivative terms: Bitchy, Catty, Nasty, Nasty, Spiteful

Definition of Spite

1. n. Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite.

2. v. t. To be angry at; to hate.

Definition of Spite

1. Noun. Ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; a desire to vex or injure; petty malice; grudge; rancor. ¹

2. Noun. Vexation; chagrin; mortification. ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To be angry at; to hate. ¹

5. Verb. (transitive) To fill with spite; to offend; to vex. ¹

6. Preposition. Notwithstanding; despite. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Spite

1. to treat with malice [v SPITED, SPITING, SPITES]

Medical Definition of Spite

1. 1. Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. "This is the deadly spite that angers." (Shak) 2. Vexation; chargrin; mortification. In spite of, or Spite of, in opposition to all efforts of; in defiance or contempt of; notwithstanding. "Continuing, spite of pain, to use a knee after it had been slightly ibnjured." . "And saved me in spite of the world, the devil, and myself." . "In spite of all applications, the patient grew worse every day." . See Syn. Under Notwithstanding. To owe one a spite, to entertain a mean hatred for him. Synonym: Pique, rancor, malevolence, grudge. Spite, Malice. Malice has more reference to the disposition, and spite to the manifestation of it in words and actions. It is, therefore, meaner than malice, thought not always more criminal. " Malice . . . Is more frequently employed to express the dispositions of inferior minds to execute every purpose of mischief within the more limited circle of their abilities." . "Consider eke, that spite availeth naught." . See Pique. Origin: Abbreviated fr. Despite. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Spite Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Spite

spitalhouses
spitals
spitball
spitballed
spitballing
spitbox
spitboxes
spitbug
spitbugs
spitchcock
spitchcocked
spitchcocking
spitchcocks
spitcher
spite (current term)
spited
spiteful
spitefull
spitefuller
spitefullest
spitefully
spitefulness
spitefulnesses
spiteless
spitelessly
spites
spitfire
spitfires
spitful

Literary usage of Spite

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The pilgrim's progress from this world to that which is to come by John Bunyan (1879)
"Then said the pilgrims' guide, These women and children are going on pilgrimage ; and this is the way they must go, and go it they shall, in spite of thee ..."

2. Jane Austen's Works by Jane Austen, James Edward Austen-Leigh (1882)
"long arranged engagements in Exeter, in spite of the absolute necessity of their returning to fulfil them immediately, which was in full force at the end of ..."

3. Jane Austen's Works by Jane Austen, James Edward Austen-Leigh (1882)
"Selina would stare when she heard of it" But, in spite of these deficiencies, the wishes, the hopes, the confidence, the predictions of the small band of ..."

4. The Novels of Jane Austen by Jane Austen, Reginald Brimley Johnson (1892)
"Poor Brandon ! he is quite smitten already, and he is very well worth setting your cap at, I can tell you, in spite of all this tumbling about and spraining ..."

5. The Novels of Jane Austen by Jane Austen, Reginald Brimley Johnson (1892)
"the same kind of delicate flattery, in spite of her entreating him to have done. That General Tilney, instead of disliking, should admire her, ..."

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