Definition of Stinging hair

1. Noun. A multicellular hair in plants like the stinging nettle that expels an irritating fluid.

Generic synonyms: Fuzz, Hair, Tomentum



Lexicographical Neighbors of Stinging Hair

stingaree-bush
stingarees
stingbull
stinged
stinger
stingerless
stingers
stingfish
stingfishes
stingier
stingiest
stingily
stinginess
stinginesses
stinging
stinging hair (current term)
stinging nettle
stingingly
stingings
stingless
stingo
stingos
stingray
stingrays
stings
stingy
stink
stink-bomb
stink-cat
stink-cats

Literary usage of Stinging hair

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Science from an Easy Chair by Edwin Ray Lankester (1911)
"A. Highly magnified drawing of a stinging hair of the common nettle. ... B shows the knobbed end of the stinging hair, and the way in which, ..."

2. Handbook of Practical Botany: For the Botanical Laboratory and Private Student by Eduard Strasburger, William Hillhouse (1900)
"^stinging hair of °f tne hair with hydrochloric acid shows, on which is a small bristle the other hand, impregnated with carbonate of lime, ..."

3. The Natural History of Plants: Their Forms, Growth, Reproduction, and by Anton Kerner von Marilaun (1902)
"The mass of tissue in which the stinging hair is imbedded consists of chlorophyll-bearing cells, and is elastic and flexible; whenever a stinging hair is ..."

4. A Textbook of Botany for Colleges and Universities by John Merle Coulter, Charles Reid Barnes, Henry Chandler Cowles (1911)
"stinging hairs: 824, a stinging hair from the wood- nettle (Laportea canadensis), a unicellular structure seated on a slight leaf emergence ..."

5. A Textbook of Botany for Colleges and Universities by John Merle Coulter, Charles Reid Barnes, Henry Chandler Cowles (1911)
"stinging hairs: 824, a stinging hair from the wood- nettle (Laportea canadensis), a unicellular structure seated on a slight leaf emergence (e); ..."

6. A Manual of Organic Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy: An Introduction to the by Lucius Elmer Sayre (1905)
"The turgescent condition of the hair must also contribute to the ejection of the fluid. FIG. 426. — A. stinging hair of Urtica urens. ..."

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