Definition of Swack

1. nimble [adj] - See also: nimble



Swack Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Swack

sverdrups
sverigeite
svl
svn
svyatoslavite
svyazhinite
swab
swabbed
swabber
swabbers
swabbie
swabbies
swabbing
swabby
swabs
swack (current term)
swacked
swad
swaddies
swaddle
swaddled
swaddler
swaddlers
swaddles
swaddling
swaddling-clothes
swaddling bands
swaddling clothes
swaddlings
swaddy

Literary usage of Swack

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language ...: Supplement by John Jamieson (1825)
"This is merely a slight obliquity from the primary sense. An object ¡s said to be weak, from this idea being suggested by its flexibility. swack, s. ..."

2. An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language: To which is Prefixed, a by John Jamieson (1879)
"A gust, a severe blast ; as, a swack of wind, Ettr. For. This is distinguished from a Sob, ... To blow suddenly and severely, S. To swack, va and n. [1. ..."

3. Jamieson's Dictionary of the Scottish Language: In which the Words are by John Jamieson, John Johnstone (1867)
"To swack, v n. To blow suddenly and severely, ibid. This is distinguished from a ... It Is not known in the sense given in £.—Teut. swack-en, vibrare ; Isl. ..."

4. Suffolk Words and Phrases: Or, An Attempt to Collect the Lingual Localisms by Edward Moor (1823)
"Ah! give us a swack a' your hand." We say also, a smack of the hand; and, I believe, swack is occasionally substituted in reference to the lips. ..."

5. The Vocabulary of East Anglia: An Attempt to Record the Vulgar Tongue of the by Robert Forby (1830)
"There is also in L. sc. swack, an adjective, which means pliant, and is derived by JAM. from Teut. swack, flexilis. All these words, in both the modern ..."

6. The Vocabulary of East Anglia: An Attempt to Record the Vulgar Tongue of the by Robert Forby (1830)
"SUSS, s. an uncleanly mess, looking like hog-wash. Possibly there may be some reference to the Latin word SMS; but V. Soss. swack, ». to throw with violence ..."

7. Suffolk Words and Phrases: Or, An Attempt to Collect the Lingual Localisms by Edward Moor (1823)
"Ah ! give us a swack a' your hand. We say also, a smack of the hand; and, I believe, swack is occasionally substituted in reference to the lips. ..."

8. A Dictionary of the Scottish Language: In which the Words are Explained in by John Jamieson (1867)
"To swack, r. i». To drink deep, and In harte ; to drink greedily ; w «will, Ayr». ... To swack. v. ti. To blow suddenly and severely, ibid. ..."

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