Definition of Take over

1. Verb. Seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession. "She seized control of the throne after her husband died"

Exact synonyms: Arrogate, Assume, Seize, Usurp
Generic synonyms: Take
Specialized synonyms: Annex, Appropriate, Capture, Conquer, Seize, Preoccupy, Hijack, Raid
Derivative terms: Arrogation, Arrogator, Assumption, Takeover, Usurpation, Usurper



2. Verb. Take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities. "When will the new President assume office?"
Exact synonyms: Adopt, Assume, Take On
Specialized synonyms: Resume
Generic synonyms: Take Office
Derivative terms: Assumption

3. Verb. Free someone temporarily from his or her obligations. "Sam cannot take over Sue "
Exact synonyms: Relieve
Specialized synonyms: Spell
Generic synonyms: Discharge, Free
Derivative terms: Reliever, Reliever

4. Verb. Take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person. ; "She agreed to bear the responsibility"
Exact synonyms: Accept, Assume, Bear
Generic synonyms: Take
Specialized synonyms: Carry-the Can, Face The Music
Derivative terms: Assumption

5. Verb. Take over ownership of; of corporations and companies. "The men take over the chairs"
Exact synonyms: Buy Out, Buy Up
Generic synonyms: Buy, Purchase
Derivative terms: Buyout, Takeover

6. Verb. Do over. ; "They would like to take it over again"
Exact synonyms: Repeat
Generic synonyms: Act, Move
Derivative terms: Repeat, Repeater, Repetitive

7. Verb. Take up and practice as one's own.
Exact synonyms: Adopt, Borrow, Take Up
Generic synonyms: Accept, Have, Take
Derivative terms: Adoption, Adoptive

8. Verb. Take up, as of debts or payments. "Absorb the costs for something"
Exact synonyms: Absorb
Generic synonyms: Fund

Definition of Take over

1. Verb. (idiomatic) to assume control of something, especially by force; to usurp ¹

2. Verb. (idiomatic) to adopt a further responsibility or duty ¹

3. Verb. (idiomatic) to relieve someone temporarily ¹

4. Verb. (idiomatic) to buy out the ownership of a business ¹

5. Verb. (idiomatic) to appropriate something without permission ¹

6. Verb. (idiomatic) to annex a territory by conquest or invasion ¹

7. Verb. (idiomatic intransitive) To become more successful than someone or something else. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Take Over Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Take Over

take one's eye off the ball
take one's hat off to
take one's leave
take one's lumps
take one's own life
take one's pick
take one's time
take one for the team
take or pay
take orders
take out
take out of context
take out the stops
take out the trash
take over (current term)
take pains
take part
take place
take point
take pride
take refuge
take responsibility
take revenge
take root
take shape
take sick
take sides
take sign
take silk

Literary usage of Take over

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Parliamentary Debates: Senate and House of Representatives by Australia Parliament (1911)
"The Constitution gives us power to take over lighthouses, ... I cannot otherwise see why we have not power to take over all that is necessary for this ..."

2. The First World War, 1914-1918: Personal Experiences of Lieut.-Col. C. à by Charles à Court Repington (1920)
"... on strategy—Strong objections to take over more of the line. Tuesday, Oct. 2. Lunched at the Lockett Agnews'. Walked round to meet Londonderry at ..."

3. The First World War, 1914-1918: Personal Experiences of Lieut.-Col. C. à by Charles à Court Repington (1920)
"... on strategy—Strong objections to take over more of the line. Tuesday, Oct. 2. Lunched at the Lockett Agnews'. Walked round to meet Londonderry at ..."

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