Definition of Triose

1. Noun. Any monosaccharide sugar containing three atoms of carbon per molecule.




Definition of Triose

1. n. A sugar derived from a trihydric alcohol

Definition of Triose

1. Noun. (chemistry) A sugar or saccharide containing three carbon atoms. Trioses are the smallest monosaccharides. Dihydroxyacetone and L- / D-glyceraldehyde are the only trioses. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Triose

1. a simple sugar [n -S]

Medical Definition of Triose

1. A simple sugar that has a three-carbon backbone. (09 Oct 1997)

Triose Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Triose

trional
trione
triones
trionic
trionychoidea
trionym
trionyms
trionyx
triophthalmos
trior
triorchidism
triorchism
triors
triorthocresyl phosphate
trios
triose (current term)
triosekinase
triosephosphate
trioses
triotus
trioval
trioxane
trioxanes
trioxid
trioxidane
trioxide
trioxides
trioxids
trioxolane

Literary usage of Triose

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Elements of the Science of Nutrition by Graham Lusk (1917)
"Since glycerin is convertible into a triose, it is apparent that from glycerin and ingested sugar two molecules of triose are available for simultaneous ..."

2. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Food and Drugs, Pt. 800-1299, Revised by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Staff (2005)
"A triose phosphate ... test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate ..."

3. Essentials of Physiology: Prepared Especially for Students of Medicine by Sidney Payne Budgett (1901)
"... beginning with triose; in- the triose group there are two possible isomers, only one, ... or a multiple of three,—namely, members of the triose, ..."

4. Essentials of Physiology: Prepared Especially for Students of Medicine by Sidney Payne Budgett, Haven Emerson (1905)
"... beginning with triose; in the triose group there are two possible isomers, only one, ... or a multiple of three,—namely, members of the triose, hexose, ..."

5. Essentials of physiology by Sidney Payne Budgett (1909)
"... beginning with triose; in the triose group there are two possible isomers, only one, ... or a multiple of three,—namely, members of the triose, hexose, ..."

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