Definition of Twilight

1. Noun. The time of day immediately following sunset. "They finished before the fall of night"

Exact synonyms: Crepuscle, Crepuscule, Dusk, Evenfall, Fall, Gloam, Gloaming, Nightfall
Group relationships: Eve, Even, Evening, Eventide
Specialized synonyms: Night
Generic synonyms: Hour, Time Of Day
Derivative terms: Crepuscular, Crepuscular, Dusky



2. Adjective. Lighted by or as if by twilight. "A boat on a twilit river"
Exact synonyms: Dusky, Twilit
Similar to: Dark
Derivative terms: Dusk, Duskiness

3. Noun. The diffused light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon but its rays are refracted by the atmosphere of the earth.

4. Noun. A condition of decline following successes. "In the twilight of the empire"
Generic synonyms: Declination, Decline

Definition of Twilight

1. n. The light perceived before the rising, and after the setting, of the sun, or when the sun is less than 18° below the horizon, occasioned by the illumination of the earth's atmosphere by the direct rays of the sun and their reflection on the earth.

2. a. Seen or done by twilight.

Definition of Twilight

1. Noun. The soft light in the sky seen before the rising and (especially) after the setting of the sun, occasioned by the illumination of the earth’s atmosphere by the direct rays of the sun and their reflection on the earth. ¹

2. Noun. The time when this light is visible; the period between daylight and darkness. ¹

3. Noun. Any faint light through which something is seen; an in-between or fading condition. ¹

4. Adjective. Pertaining to or resembling twilight ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Twilight

1. the early evening light [n -S]

Medical Definition of Twilight

1. 1. The light perceived before the rising, and after the setting, of the sun, or when the sun is less than 18 deg below the horizon, occasioned by the illumination of the earth's atmosphere by the direct rays of the sun and their reflection on the earth. 2. Faint light; a dubious or uncertain medium through which anything is viewed. "As when the sun . . . From behind the moon, In dim eclipse. Disastrous twilight sheds." (Milton) "The twilight of probability." (Locke) Origin: OE. Twilight, AS. Twi- (see Twice) + leoht light; hence the sense of doubtful or half light; cf. LG. Twelecht, G. Zwielicht. See Light. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Twilight Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Twilight

twiggiest
twigging
twiggy
twight
twighted
twighting
twights
twigil
twigils
twigless
twiglike
twigloo
twigloos
twigs
twigsome
twilight (current term)
twilight(a)
twilight sleep
twilight state
twilight vision
twilight years
twilight zone
twilight zones
twilightish
twilights
twilighty
twilit
twilitten
twill
twill weave

Literary usage of Twilight

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The American Journal of Psychology by Granville Stanley Hall, Edward Bradford Titchener (1903)
"My mind is duller at twilight than at any other time. F., 19. In the twilight my ... When I am alone in the twilight I have a feeling of utter loneliness. ..."

2. The Yellow Book by F. Harrison (1894)
"SPIRIT of twilight, through your folded wings I catch a glimpse of your averted ... Spirit of twilight, you are like a song That sleeps, and waits a singer, ..."

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