Definition of Will

1. Noun. The capability of conscious choice and decision and intention. "The exercise of their volition we construe as revolt"

Exact synonyms: Volition
Generic synonyms: Faculty, Mental Faculty, Module
Specialized synonyms: Velleity
Derivative terms: Volitional



2. Verb. Decree or ordain. "God wills our existence"
Generic synonyms: Ordain

3. Noun. A fixed and persistent intent or purpose. "Where there's a will there's a way"
Generic synonyms: Aim, Design, Intent, Intention, Purpose

4. Verb. Determine by choice. "This action was willed and intended"
Generic synonyms: Decide, Determine, Make Up One's Mind
Derivative terms: Willing

5. Noun. A legal document declaring a person's wishes regarding the disposal of their property when they die.
Exact synonyms: Testament
Specialized synonyms: Old Testament, New Testament, Devise
Generic synonyms: Instrument, Legal Document, Legal Instrument, Official Document
Terms within: Codicil
Category relationships: Jurisprudence, Law
Derivative terms: Testamentary

6. Verb. Leave or give by will after one's death. "They will them the money"; "My grandfather left me his entire estate"
Exact synonyms: Bequeath, Leave
Related verbs: Leave, Leave Behind, Give, Impart, Leave, Pass On
Generic synonyms: Gift, Give, Present
Specialized synonyms: Devise, Pass On, Remember, Entail, Fee-tail
Antonyms: Disinherit

Definition of Will

1. n. The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

2. v. t. & auxiliary. To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

3. v. i. To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

4. v. t. To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

5. v. i. To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

6. n. The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

7. v. t. & auxiliary. To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

8. v. i. To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

9. v. t. To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

10. v. i. To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

Definition of Will

1. Proper noun. (diminutive=William male given name). Also used as a formal given name. ¹

2. Proper noun. (surname patronymic from=given names) ¹

3. Noun. (American football) A weak-side linebacker. ¹

4. Noun. (archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.) (defdate from 9th c.) ¹

5. Noun. One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention. (defdate from 9th c.) ¹

6. Noun. One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. (defdate from 9th c.) ¹

7. Noun. (archaic) That which is desired; one's wish. (defdate from 10th c.) ¹

8. Noun. The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition. (defdate from 10th c.) ¹

9. Noun. A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes. (defdate from 14th c.) ¹

10. Verb. (obsolete) To wish, desire. (defdate 9th-19th c.) ¹

11. Verb. (transitive intransitive) To instruct (that something be done) in one's will. (defdate from 9th c.) ¹

12. Verb. (transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention). (defdate from 10th c.) ¹

13. Verb. (transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document). (defdate from 15th c.) ¹

14. Verb. (rare transitive) To wish, desire (something). (defdate 9th-18th c.) ¹

15. Verb. (rare intransitive) To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that). (defdate 9th-19th c.) ¹

16. Verb. (auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action). (defdate from 9th c.) ¹

17. Verb. (auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive). (defdate from 10th c.) ¹

18. Verb. (auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, formerly with some implication of volition when used in first person. Compare (term shall). (defdate from 10th c.) ¹

19. Verb. (auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to. (defdate from 14th c.) ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Will

1. to decide upon [v -ED, -ING, -S] : WILLABLE [adj] / used as an auxiliary followed by a simple infinitive to express futurity, inclination, likelihood, or requirement [v past sing. 2d person WOULD, WOULDEST, or WOULDST]

Medical Definition of Will

1. 1. The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects. "It is necessary to form a distinct notion of what is meant by the word "volition" in order to understand the import of the word will, for this last word expresses the power of mind of which "volition" is the act." (Stewart) "Will is an ambiguous word, being sometimes put for the faculty of willing; sometimes for the act of that faculty, besides [having] other meanings. But "volition" always signifies the act of willing, and nothing else." (Reid) "Appetite is the will's solicitor, and the will is appetite's controller; what we covet according to the one, by the other we often reject." (Hooker) "The will is plainly that by which the mind chooses anything." (J. Edwards) 2. The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition. "The word "will," however, is not always used in this its proper acceptation, but is frequently substituted for "volition", as when I say that my hand mover in obedience to my will." (Stewart) 3. The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure. "Thy will be done." (Matt. Vi. 10) "Our prayers should be according to the will of God." (Law) 4. Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose. "Inclination is another word with which will is frequently confounded. Thus, when the apothecary says, in Romeo and Juliet, "My poverty, but not my will, consents; . . . Put this in any liquid thing you will, And drink it off." the word will is plainly used as, synonymous with inclination; not in the strict logical sense, as the immediate antecedent of action. It is with the same latitude that the word is used in common conversation, when we speak of doing a thing which duty prescribes, against one's own will; or when we speak of doing a thing willingly or unwillingly." 5. That which is strongly wished or desired. "What's your will, good friar?" (Shak) "The mariner hath his will." (Coleridge) 6. Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine. "Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies." (Ps. Xxvii. 12) 7. The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament. Wills are written or nuncupative, that is, oral. See Nuncupative will, under Nuncupative. at will, at pleasure. To hold an estate at the will of another, is to enjoy the possession at his pleasure, and be liable to be ousted at any time by the lessor or proprietor. An estate at will is at the will of both parties. Good will. See Good. Ill will, enmity; unfriendliness; malevolence. To have one's will, to obtain what is desired; to do what one pleases. Will worship, worship according to the dictates of the will or fancy; formal worship. Will worshiper, one who offers will worship. With a will, with willingness and zeal; with all one's heart or strength; earnestly; heartily. Origin: OE. Wille, AS. Willa; akin to OFries. Willa, OS. Willeo, willio, D. Wil, G. Wille, Icel. Vili, Dan. Villie, Sw. Vilja, Goth wilja. See Will. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Will Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Will

wilhelmramsayite
wilhelmvierlingite
wili
wilier
wiliest
wilily
wiliness
wilinesses
wiling
wilis
wilja
wiljas
wilk
wilkinsonite
wilkmanite
will (current term)
will've
will-less
will-maker
will-o'-the-wisp
will-o'-wisp
will contest
will contests
will contract
will contracts
will do
will o' the wisp
will o' the wisps
will of the wisp
will on

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