Definition of Gorge

1. Noun. A deep ravine (usually with a river running through it).

Specialized synonyms: Cataract Canyon, Grand Canyon, Olduvai Gorge
Specialized synonyms: Flume, Gulch
Generic synonyms: Ravine



2. Verb. Overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself. "The kids binged on ice cream"

3. Noun. A narrow pass (especially one between mountains).
Exact synonyms: Defile
Generic synonyms: Mountain Pass, Notch, Pass

4. Noun. The passage between the pharynx and the stomach.

Definition of Gorge

1. n. The throat; the gullet; the canal by which food passes to the stomach.

2. v. t. To swallow; especially, to swallow with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities.

3. v. i. To eat greedily and to satiety.

4. n. A primitive device used instead of a fishhook, consisting of an object easy to be swallowed but difficult to be ejected or loosened, as a piece of bone or stone pointed at each end and attached in the middle to a line.

Definition of Gorge

1. Noun. A deep narrow passage with steep rocky sides; a ravine. ¹

2. Noun. The throat or gullet. ¹

3. Verb. (context: reflexive followed by '''on''') To eat greedily and in large quantities. ¹

4. Adjective. (slang) Gorgeous. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Gorge

1. to stuff with food [v GORGED, GORGING, GORGES] : GORGEDLY [adv]

Medical Definition of Gorge

1. 1. The throat; the gullet; the canal by which food passes to the stomach. "Wherewith he gripped her gorge with so great pain." (Spenser) "Now, how abhorred! . . . My gorge rises at it." (Shak) 2. A narrow passage or entrance; as: A defile between mountains. The entrance into a bastion or other outwork of a fort; usually synonymous with rear. 3. That which is gorged or swallowed, especially by a hawk or other fowl. "And all the way, most like a brutish beast,< e spewed up his gorge, that all did him detest." (Spenser) 4. A filling or choking of a passage or channel by an obstruction; as, an ice gorge in a river. 5. A concave molding; a cavetto. 6. The groove of a pulley. Gorge circle, the outline of the smallest cross-section of a hyperboloid of revolution. Gorge hook, two fishhooks, separated by a piece of lead. Origin: F. Gorge, LL. Gorgia, throat, narrow pass, and gorga abyss, whirlpool, prob. Fr. L. Gurgea whirlpool, gulf, abyss; cf. Skr. Gargara whirlpool, go to devour. Cf. Gorget. 1. To swallow; especially, to swallow with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities. "The fish has gorged the hook." (Johnson) 2. To glut; to fill up to the throat; to satiate. "The giant gorged with flesh." (Addison) "Gorge with my blood thy barbarous appetite." (Dryden) Origin: F. Gorger. See Gorge. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Gorge Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Gorge

gordian
gordita
gorditas
gordius
gordonite
gore
gorebill
gorebills
gored
gorefest
gorefests
gorehound
gorehounds
gores
gorfly
gorge (current term)
gorge-walking
gorge walking
gorged
gorgedly
gorgelet
gorgelets
gorgeous
gorgeously
gorgeousness
gorgeousnesses
gorger
gorgerin
gorgerins
gorgers

Literary usage of Gorge

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Geographical Journal by Royal Geographical Society (Great Britain). (1908)
"+ There are many stretches of the river in the gorge where a strong well-manned canoe, if skilfully bundled, might, I think, bo navigated ..."

2. Geological Magazine by Henry Woodward (1902)
"The following figure illustrates my explanation. Diagrammatic plan of part of the Cheddar gorge, showing the rectangular jointing, the open joints followed ..."

3. The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U.S.A., in the Rocky Mountains and the by Washington Irving, Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville (1898)
"The Party Enters the Mountain gorge—A Wild Fastness among the Hills—Mountain Mutton— Peace and Plenty—The Amorous Trapper—A Piebald Wedding—A Free Trapper's ..."

4. The Overland Monthly by Bret Harte (1872)
"THE gorge OF THE COLUMBIA. WE arrive now at what the tourist must ever regard as the most interesting portion of the river—the gorge cf the Columbia. ..."

5. The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U.S.A., in the Rocky Mountains and the by Washington Irving, Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville (1868)
"The party enters the mountain gorge. — A wild fastness among the hills. — Mountain mutton. — Peace and plenty. — The amorous trapper. — A piebald wedding. ..."

6. The Invasion of the Crimea: Its Origin and an Account of Its Progress Down by Alexander William Kinglake (1875)
"... now occupied the gorge of the Sandbag Battery and the ground on its flanks. The wing The wing of the 95th which we long ago saw ..."

7. The Journal of Geology by University of Chicago Department of Geology and Paleontology (1904)
"The postglacial gorge is 25 yards wide, 50 yards long, and 90 feet deep. The gorge south of the southern ridge is over 250 yards wide and 100 feet deep. ..."

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