Definition of Music

1. Noun. An artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner.

Examples of category: Transposition, Release, Tone Ending, Entr'acte, Interlude, Intermezzo, Recapitulation, Tuning, Audio Cd, Audio Compact Disc, Barrel Organ, Grind Organ, Hand Organ, Hurdy Gurdy, Hurdy-gurdy, Street Organ, Electric Organ, Electronic Organ, Hammond Organ, Organ, Soundboard, Sounding Board, Stop, String, Synthesiser, Synthesizer, Unison, Registration, Quality, Timber, Timbre, Tone, Crescendo, Forte, Fortissimo, Decrescendo, Diminuendo, Pianissimo, Piano, Fermata, Register, Pyrotechnics, Section, Subdivision, Dedication, Inscription, Exposition, Musical Notation, Sheet Music, Musical Scale, Scale, Fanfare, Flourish, Tucket, Slide, Swoop, Gamut, Roulade, Keynote, Tonic, Supertonic, Mediant, Subdominant, Dominant, Submediant, Leading Tone, Subtonic, Staff, Stave, Slur, Tie, C, C Major, C Major Scale, Scale Of C Major, Segno, Sforzando, World Premiere, Preparation, Resolution, Idea, Melodic Theme, Musical Theme, Theme, Statement, Recapitulation, Ligature, Largo, Larghetto, Suite, Adagio, Syncopation, Expressive Style, Style, Development, Arioso, Vibrato, Brass Family, Violin Family, Woodwind Family, Executant, Musician, Sightreader, Tremolo, Musical Time, Note Value, Time Value, Value, Pacing, Tempo, Beats Per Minute, Bpm, M.m., Metronome Marking, Invert, Sharpen, Drop, Flatten, Sound Off, Strike Up, Compose, Write, Counterpoint, Set To Music, Arrange, Set, Put, Score, Transpose, Melodise, Melodize, Harmonise, Harmonize, Realise, Realize, Fiddle, Play, Swing, Rag, Play, Beat, Chord, Solmizate, Prepare, Chromatic, Diatonic, Pop, Popular, Conjunct, Disjunct, Diminished, Bowed, Plucked, Fast, Slow, First, Second, Copyrighted, Dissonant, Unresolved, Alto, Tenor, Lyric, Dramatic, Major, Minor, Cantabile, Singing, Monophonic, Contrapuntal, Polyphonic, Natural, Sharp, Flat, Solo, Con Brio, Disconnected, Staccato, Legato, Smooth, Masculine, Feminine, Tonal, Atonal, Unkeyed, Atonalistic, Fretted, Unfretted, Serial, Polyphonic, Polyphonous, Lyric, Measured, Mensurable, Mensural, Con Brio, Fugally, Presto, Largo, Accelerando, Adagio, Andante, Allegretto, Allegro, Glissando, Molto, Pizzicato, Prestissimo, Rallentando, Dolce
Specialized synonyms: Section, Subdivision, Pizzicato, Monody, Monophonic Music, Monophony, Concerted Music, Polyphonic Music, Polyphony, Polytonalism, Polytonality, Popularism, Harmony, Musical Harmony, Air, Line, Melodic Line, Melodic Phrase, Melody, Strain, Tune, Part Music, Composition, Musical Composition, Opus, Piece, Piece Of Music, Instrumental Music, Prelude, Overture, Antiphony, Chorus, Refrain, Ballet, Dance Music, Serial Music, Serialism, Syncopation, Genre, Music Genre, Musical Genre, Musical Style, Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Gilbert And Sullivan, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Stravinsky, Wagner, Ta'ziyeh, Vocal, Vocal Music
Generic synonyms: Auditory Communication
Derivative terms: Musician, Musician



2. Noun. Any agreeable (pleasing and harmonious) sounds. "He fell asleep to the music of the wind chimes"

3. Noun. Musical activity (singing or whistling etc.). "His music was his central interest"

4. Noun. (music) the sounds produced by singers or musical instruments (or reproductions of such sounds).

5. Noun. Punishment for one's actions. "Take your medicine"
Exact synonyms: Medicine
Generic synonyms: Penalisation, Penalization, Penalty, Punishment

Definition of Music

1. n. The science and the art of tones, or musical sounds, i. e., sounds of higher or lower pitch, begotten of uniform and synchronous vibrations, as of a string at various degrees of tension; the science of harmonical tones which treats of the principles of harmony, or the properties, dependences, and relations of tones to each other; the art of combining tones in a manner to please the ear.

Definition of Music

1. Noun. A sound, or the study of such sounds, organized in time. ¹

2. Noun. (figuratively) Any pleasing or interesting sounds. ¹

3. Noun. A guide to playing or singing a particular tune; sheet music. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive) To seduce or entice with music. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Music

1. vocal or instrumental sounds organized to produce a unified composition [n -S]

Medical Definition of Music

1. 1. The science and the art of tones, or musical sounds, i.e, sounds of higher or lower pitch, begotten of uniform and synchronous vibrations, as of a string at various degrees of tension; the science of harmonical tones which treats of the principles of harmony, or the properties, dependences, and relations of tones to each other; the art of combining tones in a manner to please the ear. Not all sounds are tones. Sounds may be unmusical and yet please the ear. Music deals with tones, and with no other sounds. See Tone. 2. Melody; a rhythmical and otherwise agreeable succession of tones. Harmony; an accordant combination of simultaneous tones. 3. The written and printed notation of a musical composition; the score. 4. Love of music; capacity of enjoying music. "The man that hath ni music in himself Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils." (Shak) 5. A more or less musical sound made by many of the lower animals. See Stridulation. Magic music, a game in which a person is guided in finding a hidden article, or in doing a specific art required, by music which is made more loud or rapid as he approaches success, and slower as he recedes. Music box. See Musical box, under Musical. Music hall, a place for public musical entertainments. Music loft, a gallery for musicians, as in a dancing room or a church. Music of the spheres, the harmony supposed to be produced by the accordant movement of the celestial spheres. Music paper, paper ruled with the musical staff, for the use of composers and copyists. Music pen, a pen for ruling at one time the five lines of the musical staff. Music shell, a handsomely coloured marine gastropod shell (Voluta musica) found in the East Indies; so called because the colour markings often resemble printed music. Sometimes applied to other shells similarly marked. To face the music, to meet any disagreeable necessity without flinching. Origin: F. Musique, fr. L. Musica, Gr. (sc), any art over which the Muses presided, especially music, lyric poetry set and sung to music, fr. Belonging to Muses or fine arts, fr. Muse. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Music Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Music Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Music

mushroom sauce
mushroom wine sauce
mushroomburger
mushroomburgers
mushroomed
mushroomer
mushroomers
mushrooming
mushroomless
mushroomlike
mushroomoid
mushrooms
mushroomy
mushy
mushy peas
music (current term)
music blindness
music box
music boxes
music center
music centers
music centre
music centres
music chart
music charts
music critic
music department
music director
music genre
music hall

Literary usage of Music

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature by H.W. Wilson Company (1916)
"Lit Digest 53:1367 N 18 '16 Judging the latest thing in music. ... Mus Q 2:418-24 Jl '16 Making music more musical; an interview with Thomas A. Edison. ..."

2. Handel by Charles Francis Abdy Williams (1901)
"Chapter I •, The condition of music and musicians at the end of the seventeenth century — Handel's ancestry — His birth and childhood — Visits Weissenfels ..."

3. The Evolution of Modern Orchestration by Louis Adolphe Coerne (1908)
"CHAPTER I. THE CRADLE OF INSTRUMENTAL music. (HISTORICAL REVIEW.) I. PRIMITIVE men were no doubt impelled to give utterance to their feelings by a desire ..."

4. University Musical Encyclopedia by Louis Charles Elson (1912)
"TT is customary in discussing the beginnings of music in America to dwell upon the low state ... Let us cherish the belief that an American school of music, ..."

5. Publishers Weeklyby Publishers' Board of Trade (U.S.), Book Trade Association of Philadelphia, American Book Trade Union, Am. Book Trade Association, R.R. Bowker Company by Publishers' Board of Trade (U.S.), Book Trade Association of Philadelphia, American Book Trade Union, Am. Book Trade Association, R.R. Bowker Company (1902)
"HW 10 Natural music Course (Ripley and Tapper): Primer AM *30 Natural music Reader, No. 1 AM »80 2 AM «35 8 AM *3fi 4 AM «35 5 AM «50 " Advanced . ..."

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