Definition of Romance

1. Noun. A relationship between two lovers.

Exact synonyms: Love Affair
Generic synonyms: Relationship
Specialized synonyms: Intrigue
Derivative terms: Romantic



2. Verb. Make amorous advances towards. "Sam cannot romance Sue "; "John is courting Mary"
Exact synonyms: Court, Solicit, Woo
Generic synonyms: Act, Move
Specialized synonyms: Chase, Chase After, Display
Derivative terms: Courting, Wooer, Wooing

3. Adjective. Relating to languages derived from Latin. "Romance languages"
Exact synonyms: Latin

4. Noun. An exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure).
Exact synonyms: Romanticism
Generic synonyms: Quality
Specialized synonyms: Stardust

5. Verb. Have a love affair with. "Sam cannot romance Sue "
Generic synonyms: Love

6. Noun. The group of languages derived from Latin.

7. Verb. Talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions. "Sam wants to romance with Sue "; "My husband never flirts with other women"
Exact synonyms: Butterfly, Chat Up, Coquet, Coquette, Dally, Flirt, Mash, Philander
Generic synonyms: Speak, Talk
Specialized synonyms: Wanton, Vamp
Derivative terms: Coquetry, Coquette, Dalliance, Flirt, Flirt, Flirtation, Flirting, Masher

8. Noun. A story dealing with love.
Exact synonyms: Love Story
Generic synonyms: Story

9. Verb. Tell romantic or exaggerated lies. "This author romanced his trip to an exotic country"
Generic synonyms: Lie

10. Noun. A novel dealing with idealized events remote from everyday life.
Generic synonyms: Novel
Specialized synonyms: Gothic Romance, Bodice Ripper
Derivative terms: Romantic

Definition of Romance

1. n. A species of fictitious writing, originally composed in meter in the Romance dialects, and afterward in prose, such as the tales of the court of Arthur, and of Amadis of Gaul; hence, any fictitious and wonderful tale; a sort of novel, especially one which treats of surprising adventures usually befalling a hero or a heroine; a tale of extravagant adventures, of love, and the like.

2. a. Of or pertaining to the language or dialects known as Romance.

3. v. i. To write or tell romances; to indulge in extravagant stories.

Definition of Romance

1. Noun. The group of languages and cultures which are derived from Latin. ¹

2. Adjective. Of or dealing with languages or cultures derived from Roman influence and Latin: as in Portuguese, Italian, French, and Spanish. ¹

3. Noun. An intimate relationship between two people; a love affair. ¹

4. Noun. A strong obsession or attachment for something or someone. ¹

5. Noun. Love which is pure or beautiful. ¹

6. Noun. A mysterious, exciting, or fascinating quality. ¹

7. Noun. A story or novel dealing with idealised love. ¹

8. Noun. An embellished account of something; an idealised lie. ¹

9. Verb. Woo; court. ¹

10. Verb. (intransitive) To write or tell romantic stories, poetry, letters, etc. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Romance

1. to woo [v -MANCED, -MANCING, -MANCES] - See also: woo

Medical Definition of Romance

1. 1. A species of fictitious writing, originally composed in meter in the Romance dialects, and afterward in prose, such as the tales of the court of Arthur, and of Amadis of Gaul; hence, any fictitious and wonderful tale; a sort of novel, especially one which treats of surprising adventures usually befalling a hero or a heroine; a tale of extravagant adventures, of love, and the like. "Romances that been royal." "Upon these three columns chivalry, gallantry, and religion repose the fictions of the Middle Ages, especially those known as romances. These, such as we now know them, and such as display the characteristics above mentioned, were originally metrical, and chiefly written by nations of the north of France." (Hallam) 2. An adventure, or series of extraordinary events, resembling those narrated in romances; as, his courtship, or his life, was a romance. 3. A dreamy, imaginative habit of mind; a disposition to ignore what is real; as, a girl full of romance. 4. The languages, or rather the several dialects, which were originally forms of popular or vulgar Latin, and have now developed into Italian. Spanish, French, etc. (called the Romanic languages). 5. A short lyric tale set to music; a song or short instrumental piece in ballad style; a romanza. Synonym: Fable, novel, fiction, tale. Origin: OE. Romance, romant, romaunt, OF. Romanz, romans, romant, roman, F. Roman, romance, fr. LL. Romanice in the Roman language, in the vulgar tongue, i. E, in the vulgar language which sprang from Latin, the language of the Romans, and hence applied to fictitious compositions written in this vulgar tongue; fr. L. Romanicus Roman, fr. Romanus. See Roman, and cf. Romanic, Romaunt, Romansch, Romanza. Of or pertaining to the language or dialects known as Romance. To write or tell romances; to indulge in extravagant stories. "A very brave officer, but apt to romance." (Walpole) Origin: Romanced; Romancing. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Romance Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Romance Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Romance

romaines
romaja
romaji
romajis
romal
romals
roman
roman a clef
roman fleuve
roman font
roman letters
roman print
roman type
roman world
roman à clef
romance (current term)
romanced
romanceless
romancelike
romancer
romancers
romances
romancing
romancist
romancists
romancy
romanechite
romanechites
romanesque
romanette

Literary usage of Romance

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Cambridge Modern History by John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Acton, Ernest Alfred Benians, Sir Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero (1909)
"In none of them does there seem to be any opposition between Hellenism and romance. The former either enters as a controlling force, arranging material ..."

2. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1920)
"This popular romance by Jules Verne tells an exciting story that makes a powerful appeal to the imagination of most young people and to not a few of their ..."

3. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann, Edward Aloysius Pace, Condé Bénoist Pallen, Thomas Joseph Shahan, John Joseph Wynne (1913)
"In the second half of the nineteenth century the romance developed to an extent even more ... This theory of the romance is in evidence in all his works, ..."

4. The English Novel: Being a Short Sketch of Its History from the Earliest by Walter Alexander Raleigh (1894)
"CHAPTER I. THE romance AND THE NOVEL. TIME and again, in the world's history, ... The earlier English romances, like the word romance itself, are mediaeval ..."

5. The English Novel: Being a Short Sketch of Its History from the Earliest by Walter Alexander Raleigh (1904)
"CHAPTER I. THE romance AND THE NOVEL. TIME and again, in the world's history, ... The earlier English romances, like the word romance itself, are mediaeval ..."

6. Journal by English Place-Name Society (1913)
"The romance of Irish History. By John G. Rowe. Dublin: The Talbot Press. 89 Talbot Street. 1913. 4/6. We have pleasure in commending this volume to the ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Romance

Search for Romance on Dictionary.com!Search for Romance on Thesaurus.com!Search for Romance on Google!Search for Romance on Wikipedia!

Search

Translations