Definition of Electricity

1. Noun. A physical phenomenon associated with stationary or moving electrons and protons.




2. Noun. Energy made available by the flow of electric charge through a conductor. "They built a car that runs on electricity"

3. Noun. Keen and shared excitement. "The stage crackled with electricity whenever she was on it"
Generic synonyms: Stir
Derivative terms: Electric, Electrify

Definition of Electricity

1. n. A power in nature, a manifestation of energy, exhibiting itself when in disturbed equilibrium or in activity by a circuit movement, the fact of direction in which involves polarity, or opposition of properties in opposite directions; also, by attraction for many substances, by a law involving attraction between surfaces of unlike polarity, and repulsion between those of like; by exhibiting accumulated polar tension when the circuit is broken; and by producing heat, light, concussion, and often chemical changes when the circuit passes between the poles or through any imperfectly conducting substance or space. It is generally brought into action by any disturbance of molecular equilibrium, whether from a chemical, physical, or mechanical, cause.

Definition of Electricity

1. Noun. A form of energy usually carried by wires or supplied by batteries used to power machines and computing, communications, lighting, and heating devices. ¹

2. Noun. A form of secondary energy, caused by the behavior of electrons and protons, properly called "electrical energy". ¹

3. Noun. A fundamental attractive property of matter, appearing in negative and positive kinds. ¹

4. Noun. The flow of charge carriers within a conductor, properly called "electric current". ¹

5. Noun. The charge carriers within a conductor, properly called "electric charge". ¹

6. Noun. A class of physical phenomena, related to flows and interactions of electric charge ¹

7. Noun. A field of physical science and technology, concerned with the phenomena of electric charge ¹

8. Noun. Excitement. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Electricity

1. [n -TIES]

Medical Definition of Electricity

1. Origin: Cf. F. Electricite. See Electric. 1. A power in nature, a manifestation of energy, exhibiting itself when in disturbed equilibrium or in activity by a circuit movement, the fact of direction in which involves polarity, or opposition of properties in opposite directions; also, by attraction for many substances, by a law involving attraction between surfaces of unlike polarity, and repulsion between those of like; by exhibiting accumulated polar tension when the circuit is broken; and by producing heat, light, concussion, and often chemical changes when the circuit passes between the poles or through any imperfectly conducting substance or space. It is generally brought into action by any disturbance of molecular equilibrium, whether from a chemical, physical, or mechanical, cause. Electricity is manifested under following different forms: (a) Statical electricity, called also Frictional or Common, electricity, electricity in the condition of a stationary charge, in which the disturbance is produced by friction, as of glass, amber, etc, or by induction. (b) Dynamical electricity, called also Voltaic electricity, electricity in motion, or as a current produced by chemical decomposition, as by means of a voltaic battery, or by mechanical action, as by dynamo-electric machines. (c) Thermoelectricity, in which the disturbing cause is heat (attended possibly with some chemical action). It is developed by uniting two pieces of unlike metals in a bar, and then heating the bar unequally. (d) Atmospheric electricity, any condition of electrical disturbance in the atmosphere or clouds, due to some or all of the above mentioned causes. (e) Magnetic electricity, electricity developed by the action of magnets. (f) Positive electricity, the electricity that appears at the positive pole or anode of a battery, or that is produced by friction of glass; called also vitreous electricity. (g) Negative electricity, the electricity that appears at the negative pole or cathode, or is produced by the friction of resinous substance; called also resinous electricity. (h) Organic electricity, that which is developed in organic structures, either animal or vegetable, the phrase animal electricity being much more common. 2. The science which unfolds the phenomena and laws of electricity; electrical science. 3. Electrifying energy or characteristic. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Electricity

electrical storm
electrical switch
electrical synapse
electrical system
electrical systole
electrical tape
electrical tapes
electrical work
electrically
electricalness
electricals
electrician
electricians
electricidal
electricities
electricity
electricity meter
electricity meters
electricity pylon
electricity pylons
electricize
electricized
electricizing
electrick
electricness
electrics
electrifiable
electrification
electrifications
electrified

Literary usage of Electricity

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature by H.W. Wilson Company (1913)
"Electricity, Injuries from. Artificial respiration with a lemon squeezer. AC Muller, il. ... Electrified chickens—electricity as a growth stimulator. II. ..."

2. Energy policies of IEA countries by International Energy Agency (2005)
"POLICY OBJECTIVES IN THE Electricity SECTOR The objectives of the Turkish government in the electricity sector are: • Diversification of primary energy ..."

3. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"This force considered as acting on any element of electricity we shall call an ... In perfectly conducting substances electricity moves with perfect freedom ..."

4. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1868)
"These authors say that "the science of the medical use of electricity is just emerging from infancy into childhood," without adverting to the fact that ..."

5. Bulletin of the New York Public Library by New York Public Library (1902)
"Thomson (T.) An outline of the sciences of heat and electricity. ... Rudimentary electricity: being a concise exposition of the general principles of ..."

6. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1884)
"ATMOSPHERIC Electricity. AT the present time there is no satisfactory theory of the source of atmospheric electricity. Many believe, in the absence of ..."

Other Resources:

Search for Electricity on Dictionary.com!Search for Electricity on Thesaurus.com!Search for Electricity on Google!Search for Electricity on Wikipedia!