Definition of Antonomasia

1. n. The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper name instead of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero.



Definition of Antonomasia

1. Noun. (rhetoric) The substitution of an epithet or title in place of a proper noun ¹

2. Noun. (rhetoric) Use of a proper name to suggest its most obvious quality or aspect. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Antonomasia

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Antonomasia

1. The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper name instead of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero. Origin: L, fr. Gr, fr. To name instead; + to name, name. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Antonomasia Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Antonomasia Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Antonomasia

antliae
antliate
antlike
antlion
antlion fly
antlions
antly
antoeci
antoecian
antofine
antoikoi
antojito
antojitos
antoniniani
antoninianus
antonomasia (current term)
antonomasias
antonomasies
antonomastic
antonomastically
antonomasy
antonym
antonymic
antonymies
antonymous
antonymously
antonyms
antonymy
antophyte
antophytes

Literary usage of Antonomasia

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Glossary of Terms and Phrases by Henry Percy Smith (1883)
"antonomasia. [Gr.] The use of an epithet, patronymic, etc., instead of a proper name, as the "Son of Peleus," the "Iron Duke," the "Sick Man," for Achilles, ..."

2. Constructive Rhetoric by Edward Everett Hale (1896)
"antonomasia. You will remember that on p. 253 I remarked that certain forms of Synecdoche might in a measure take the place of Example in Description. ..."

3. Elements of English Composition, Grammatical, Rhetorical, Logical, and by James Robert Boyd (1874)
"THE antonomasia. This is a branch of Metonymy, and is a figure by which Proper Names are used for Common, or Common for Proper. 1. ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Antonomasia

Search for Antonomasia on Dictionary.com!Search for Antonomasia on Thesaurus.com!Search for Antonomasia on Google!Search for Antonomasia on Wikipedia!

Search