Definition of Caprice

1. Noun. A sudden desire. "He bought it on an impulse"

Exact synonyms: Impulse, Whim
Generic synonyms: Desire
Derivative terms: Capricious



Definition of Caprice

1. n. An abrupt change in feeling, opinion, or action, proceeding from some whim or fancy; a freak; a notion.

Definition of Caprice

1. Noun. An impulsive, seemingly unmotivated notion or action. ¹

2. Noun. An unpredictable or sudden condition, change, or series of changes. ¹

3. Noun. A disposition to be impulsive. ¹

4. Noun. An impulsive change of mind. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Caprice

1. a whim [n -S] - See also: whim

Caprice Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Caprice

capreolate
capreoline
capreomycidine
capreomycin
capreomycin N-acetyltransferase
capreomycin O-phosphotransferase
capreomycin sulfate
capreomycins
capri pants
capric
capric acid
capricci
capriccio
capriccios
capriccioso
caprice (current term)
caprices
capricious
capriciously
capriciousness
caprid
caprids
caprification
caprifications
caprified
caprifies
caprifig
caprifigs
caprifole
caprifoles

Literary usage of Caprice

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Allen's Synonyms and Antonyms by Frederic Sturges Allen (1920)
"5, notion, caprice, quip, quirk, fancy, device (archaic), crochet, maggot, crank, trick; see caprice. conceive, vt I. form (in the womb). ..."

2. Overtones: A Book of Temperaments: Richard Strauss, Parsifal, Verdi, Balzac by James Huneker (1904)
"THE caprice OF THE MUSICAL CAT FEW critics are prophets honored in their own ... In a word, caprice of a deep-seated order has marked the progress of music ..."

3. The Theory of the State by Johann Caspar Bluntschli, David George Ritchie, Percy Ewing Matheson, Richard Lodge (1885)
"... and often substitutes arbitrary caprice for law and right. The individual may be both honest and prudent in himself, but as a member of the assembly he ..."

4. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"This opens wide once more the door to caprice. Thus, as what is said does not fit this theory, it is claimed that a collector, or later redactor, ..."

5. Poetry by Modern Poetry Association (1921)
"... E-caprice Let us not linger over a good-bye: It is not fitting That in this too casual life I, who called you wife So many weeks ago, Should stretch ..."

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