Definition of Capricious

1. Adjective. Changeable. "Freakish weather"

Exact synonyms: Freakish
Similar to: Unpredictable
Derivative terms: Capriciousness, Freakishness



2. Adjective. Determined by chance or impulse or whim rather than by necessity or reason. "The victim of whimsical persecutions"
Exact synonyms: Impulsive, Whimsical
Similar to: Arbitrary
Derivative terms: Caprice, Capriciousness, Impulsiveness, Whimsicality, Whimsy, Whimsy

Definition of Capricious

1. a. Governed or characterized by caprice; apt to change suddenly; freakish; whimsical; changeable.

Definition of Capricious

1. Adjective. Impulsive and unpredictable; determined by chance, impulse, or whim ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Capricious

1. [adj]

Lexicographical Neighbors of Capricious

capreomycidine
capreomycin
capreomycin N-acetyltransferase
capreomycin O-phosphotransferase
capreomycin sulfate
capreomycins
capri pants
capric
capric acid
capricci
capriccio
capriccios
capriccioso
caprice
caprices
capricious (current term)
capriciously
capriciousness
caprid
caprids
caprification
caprifications
caprified
caprifies
caprifig
caprifigs
caprifole
caprifoles
caprifoliaceous
capriform

Literary usage of Capricious

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Treatise on the American Law of Administration by John Gabriel Woerner (1899)
"Distinction between Rational and capricious Will. — The distinction between truly free or ... Since I may elect to the capricious will be rational (conform- ..."

2. Allen's Synonyms and Antonyms by Frederic Sturges Allen (1920)
"Antonyms: see CHANGEABLE, VACILLATING, capricious, UNSTABLE. 4. In a sense implying continuation in time: continual, continued, persistent, sustained, ..."

3. The Law of Torts: A Treatise on the Principles of Obligations Arising from by Frederick Pollock (1908)
"capricious The capricious working of the action for seduction in of the law. modern practice has often been the subject of censure. ..."

4. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (1831)
"... and the succession of five centuries inflicted the various evils of military license, capricious despotism, and elaborate oppression. ..."

5. The Cambridge Modern History by Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero (1907)
"True child of the Renaissance as he was, his emotional, sensitive, superficial, susceptible, and capricious nature stood in the strongest contrast to the ..."

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