Definition of Grave

1. Noun. Death of a person. "From cradle to grave"

Generic synonyms: Death, Demise, Dying



2. Verb. Shape (a material like stone or wood) by whittling away at it. "She is sculpting the block of marble into an image of her husband"
Exact synonyms: Sculpt, Sculpture
Generic synonyms: Carve
Related verbs: Sculpt, Sculpture
Derivative terms: Sculptor, Sculpture, Sculpture, Sculpture, Sculpture, Sculpturer

3. Adjective. Dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises. "The judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence"
Exact synonyms: Sedate, Sober, Solemn
Similar to: Serious
Derivative terms: Graveness, Gravity, Sedateness, Soberness, Solemness, Solemnity, Solemnity

4. Noun. A place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone). "He put flowers on his mother's grave"
Exact synonyms: Tomb
Specialized synonyms: Burial Chamber, Sepulcher, Sepulchre, Sepulture, Mastaba, Mastabah
Terms within: Gravestone, Headstone, Tombstone
Generic synonyms: Place, Spot, Topographic Point

5. Verb. Carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface. "The lovers scratched their names into the bark of the tree"
Exact synonyms: Engrave, Inscribe, Scratch
Generic synonyms: Carve, Chip At
Related verbs: Engrave, Etch
Specialized synonyms: Character
Derivative terms: Engraver

6. Adjective. Causing fear or anxiety by threatening great harm. "A life-threatening disease"

7. Noun. A mark (') placed above a vowel to indicate pronunciation.
Exact synonyms: Grave Accent
Generic synonyms: Accent, Accent Mark

8. Adjective. Of great gravity or crucial import; requiring serious thought. "The weighty matters to be discussed at the peace conference"
Exact synonyms: Grievous, Heavy, Weighty
Similar to: Important, Of Import
Derivative terms: Graveness, Gravity, Weight, Weightiness

Definition of Grave

1. v. t. To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch; -- so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.

2. a. Of great weight; heavy; ponderous.

3. v. t. To dig. [Obs.] Chaucer.

4. v. i. To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.

5. n. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher. Hence: Death; destruction.

Definition of Grave

1. Noun. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher. ¹

2. Noun. death, destruction. ¹

3. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To dig. ¹

4. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave. ¹

5. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image. ¹

6. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly. ¹

7. Verb. (transitive, obsolete) To entomb; to bury. ¹

8. Verb. (transitive obsolete nautical) To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch — so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose. ¹

9. Verb. (intransitive obsolete) To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving. ¹

10. Adjective. (obsolete) Influential, important; authoritative. (defdate 16th-18th c.) ¹

11. Adjective. Characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness; not cheerful, sombre. (defdate from 16th c.) ¹

12. Adjective. Low in pitch, tone etc. (defdate from 17th c.) ¹

13. Adjective. Serious, in a negative sense; important, formidable. (defdate from 19th c.) ¹

14. Noun. A written accent used in French, Italian, and other languages. è is an ''e'' with a grave accent. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Grave

1. extremely serious [adj GRAVER, GRAVEST] / to engrave [v GRAVED, GRAVEN, GRAVING, GRAVES] - See also: engrave

Medical Definition of Grave

1. 1. To dig. Chaucer. "He hath graven and digged up a pit." (Ps. Vii. 16 (Book of Common Prayer)) 2. To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave. "Thou shalt take two onyx stones, and grave on them the names of the children of Israel." (Ex. Xxviii. 9) 3. To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image. "With gold men may the hearte grave." (Chaucer) 4. To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly. "O! may they graven in thy heart remain." (Prior) 5. To entomb; to bury. "Lie full low, graved in the hollow ground." (Shak) Origin: AS. Grafan to dig, grave, engrave; akin to OFries. Greva, D. Graven, G. Graben, OHG. & Goth. Graban, Dan. Grabe, Sw. Grafva, Icel. Grafa, but prob. Not to Gr. Grafein to write, E. Graphic. Cf. Grave, Grove. 1. Of great weight; heavy; ponderous. "His shield grave and great." (Chapman) 2. Of importance; momentous; weighty; influential; sedate; serious; said of character, relations, etc.; as, grave deportment, character, influence, etc. "Most potent, grave, and reverend seigniors." (Shak) "A grave and prudent law, full of moral equity." (Milton) 3. Not light or gay; solemn; sober; plain; as, a grave colour; a grave face. 4. (Mus) (a) Not acute or sharp; low; deep; said of sound; as, a grave note or key. "The thicker the cord or string, the more grave is the note or tone." (Moore (Encyc. Of Music)) Slow and solemn in movement. Grave accent. (Pron) See the Note under Accent. Synonym: Solemn, sober, serious, sage, staid, demure, thoughtful, sedate, weighty, momentous, important. Grave, Sober, Serious, Solemn. Sober supposes the absence of all exhilaration of spirits, and is opposed to gay or flighty; as, sober thought. Serious implies considerateness or reflection, and is opposed to jocose or sportive; as, serious and important concerns. Grave denotes a state of mind, appearance, etc, which results from the pressure of weighty interests, and is opposed to hilarity of feeling or vivacity of manner; as, a qrave remark; qrave attire. Solemn is applied to a case in which gravity is carried to its highest point; as, a solemn admonition; a solemn promise. Origin: F, fr. L. Gravis heavy; cf. It. & Sp. Grave heavy, grave. See Grief. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Grave

graunting
graunts
graupel
graupels
grauwacke
grauwackes
grav
gravadlax
gravadlaxes
gravamen
gravamens
gravamina
gravastar
gravastars
gravatar
grave (current term)
grave accent
grave accents
grave marker
grave markers
grave mound
grave robber
grave robbing
grave wax
graveclothes
graved
gravedigger
gravediggers
gravegliaite
gravel

Literary usage of Grave

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke (1849)
"can make it out that a substance which never was in the grave may come out of it,' or that the soul is no substance. " But, setting aside the substance of ..."

2. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1888)
""After the fire died down, rude tools were used to dig a grave at the middle of ... When this was done, two bodies were placed side by side in the grave, ..."

3. The Iliad of Homer by Homer, John Graham Cordery (1871)
"The hollow grave, and let the coffin down, And choked it up with huge thick-wedged stones ... This was their ministry to Hector's grave. ..."

4. Dictionary of National Biography by LESLIE. STEPHEN (1886)
"Robert Blair, the author of the 'grave' [qvj, and Isabella his wife, the daughter of Mr. William Law of Elvingston, East Lothian. ..."

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