Definition of Inhibitory

1. Adjective. Restrictive of action. "An overly strict and inhibiting discipline"

Exact synonyms: Repressing, Repressive
Similar to: Restrictive
Derivative terms: Inhibit, Repress



Definition of Inhibitory

1. a. Of or pertaining to, or producing, inhibition; consisting in inhibition; tending or serving to inhibit; as, the inhibitory action of the pneumogastric on the respiratory center.

Definition of Inhibitory

1. Adjective. that inhibits ¹

2. Adjective. of, or relating to an inhibitor ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Inhibitory

1. [adj]

Medical Definition of Inhibitory

1. Of or pertaining to, or producing, inhibition; consisting in inhibition; tending or serving to inhibit; as, the inhibitory action of the pneumogastric on the respiratory center. "I would not have you consider these criticisms as inhibitory. " (Lamb) Inhibitory nerves, those nerves which modify, inhibit, or suppress a motor or secretory act already in progress. Origin: LL. Inhibitorius: cf. F. Inhibitoire. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Inhibitory

inhibit
inhibitable
inhibited
inhibiter
inhibiters
inhibitine
inhibiting
inhibiting antibody
inhibiting hormone
inhibition
inhibition factor
inhibitions
inhibitive
inhibitor
inhibitors
inhibitory (current term)
inhibitory-motor
inhibitory fibres
inhibitory junction potential
inhibitory nerve
inhibitory postsynaptic potential
inhibitory synapse
inhibits
inhive
inhived
inhives
inhiving
inhold
inholder
inholders

Literary usage of Inhibitory

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Nature by Nature Publishing Group, Norman Lockyer (1883)
"For tactile impressions he considered that there was no inhibitory mechanism in the brain. Further investigations still, showed that both chemical and ..."

2. A Text-book of physiology: For Medical Students and Physicians by William Henry Howell (1915)
"We may conclude, therefore, that the accelerator and the inhibitory fibers are working constantly on the heart, and that its rate is the resultant or ..."

3. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1893)
"We may interpret these results as indicating that there exists in the heart an inhibitory mechanism, which is excited, stimulated into activity by ..."

4. A Text Book of Physiology by Michael Foster (1891)
"The question, What is the exact nature of the change brought about by the inhibitory and augmenting impulses respectively on their arrival at the heart ? or ..."

5. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London by Royal Society (Great Britain) (1888)
"On the other hand, stimulation of the inhibitory area, while it causes a rapid flattering action of the auricles, induces either a very marked slowing, ..."

6. A Text-book of Pharmacology and Therapeutics by Arthur Robertson Cushny (1899)
"Atropine paralyzes the inhibitory Terminations of the Vagus in the Heart, ... At .1, the heart is normal; at B.tne inhibitory fibres were stimulated ..."

7. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease by Philadelphia Neurological Society, American Neurological Association, Chicago Neurological Society, New York Neurological Association (1903)
"inhibitory Fibers of the Heart.—Van Gehuchten controverts the old idea that ... He concludes that d) the inhibitory fibers of the heart do not come from the ..."

8. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (1903)
"162(1979) trie inhibitory Polypeptide, Insulin, and Glucose Changes Produced by Growth Hormone, Prednisolone, Glucagon, Insulin, Fasting, or Diazoxide ..."

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